Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 101B. Understanding Culture: An Introduction to Anthropology. 1 Unit.

This course introduces the principles of cultural anthropology and analyzes how human groups construct and articulate meaning. It explores the various ways of thinking, feeling, subsisting, communicating, and believing. Major topics include language, economic production and consumption, sex and gender, and the creative arts as expressions of culture. Offered at least once a year. Can be used as an S course.

ANTH 190. Special Topics in Anthropology. 1 Unit.

ANTH 195. Latin I. 1 Unit.

For students who have had little or no previous Latin, these courses give students a thorough understanding of the Latin language.

ANTH 196. Latin II. 1 Unit.

For students who have had little or no previous Latin, these courses give students a thorough understanding of the Latin language. Prerequisite: ANTH 195.

ANTH 201P. Our Human Origins: Introduction to Physical Anthropology. 1 Unit.

How did human beings evolve? This course explores the basics of evolutionary theory, primate development and behavior, and the hominid fossil record. The lab includes exercises on inheritance, comparative osteology, and anthropometry.

ANTH 220A. Glory of Greece I: Greek Art and Archaeology. 1 Unit.

The cultural traditions of the Graeco-Roman world shaped virtually every aspect of European and American culture. Many elements of Greek and Roman expression have persisted into the modern world, especially artistic ideals. This course focuses on three artistic media: architecture – secular forms as expression of social hierarchy and religious forms as expression of the relationship between human and divine; pottery painting, its techniques, and the ways in which the compositions express and solidify cultural bonds; and sculpture as expression of the male and female aesthetic. This course constitutes the first part of the Glory of Greece sequence. It covers the art, archaeology, and architecture of the Neolithic, Bronze Age, Iron Age/Geometric, and Orientalizing periods, and serves as an introduction to the second half of the sequence, ANTH 221A Glory of Greece II.

ANTH 221A. Glory of Greece II: Greek Art and Archaeology. 1 Unit.

This course focuses on the artistic expression of the sixth, fifth, and fourth centuries BCE and explores the glories of the Archaic, Classical, and early Hellenistic periods.

ANTH 230A. Glory of Rome: Roman Art and Archaeology. 1 Unit.

The cultural traditions of the Graeco-Roman world shaped virtually every aspect of European and American culture. Many elements of Greek and Roman expression have persisted into the modern world, especially artistic ideals. A natural follow-up to its Glory of Greece companions, Glory of Rome also focuses on three artistic media: architecture – secular forms as expression of social hierarchy and religious forms as expression of the relationship between human and divine; pottery painting, its techniques, and how the compositions express and solidify cultural bonds; and the wall paintings of Pompeii and Herculaneum.

ANTH 285. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

This course is initiated by student interest and contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Students may take more than one ANTH 285, ANTH 385, or ANTH 485 course during their career with different titles and content.

ANTH 290. Special Topics in Anthropology. 1 Unit.

This course is initiated by student interest and contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Students may take more than one ANTH 290, ANTH 390, or ANTH 490 course during their career with different titles and content.

ANTH 301. Field Research Methods in Anthropology. 1 Unit.

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the wide variety of field research methods in anthropology, including: participant observation, network analysis, historical methods, surveys, linguistic methods, cross-cultural comparative research, visual anthropology, and others. Students will design and implement their own “mini-studies” using these techniques and gain practical experience in the field. Offered at least once every two years. Prerequisite: ANTH 101B.

ANTH 302V. From Voodoo to the Saints: African American Religions. 1 Unit.

What are the elements of African American religious traditions and how did they develop? This junior seminar examines the faith traditions of African Americans from their own perspectives, tracing the roots of African religious traditions, such as Voodoo, the shaping force slavery had on slaves and their perceptions of the divine, the ways in which African elements were incorporated into Christianity (especially Catholicism) during and immediately following the abolition of slavery, and the ways that African Americans have historically used religious institutions as windows through which freedom, social needs, and political organization and expression are visualized and articulated. Junior Seminar.

ANTH 310V. No Way Out: Pompeii and Katrina. 1 Unit.

What is a “natural” disaster? This course explores the concept of disaster by focusing on the concept that so-called natural disasters are often the result of human activities and highlight systems of social inequality. Using the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 ACE and Katrina’s effect on New Orleans in 2005, this course explores the demographic shape of disaster. Junior Seminar.

ANTH 385. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

This course is initiated by student interest and contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Students may take more than one ANTH 285, ANTH 385, or ANTH 485 course during their career with different titles and content.

ANTH 390. Special Topics in Anthropology. 1 Unit.

This course is initiated by student interest and contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Students may take more than one ANTH 290, ANTH 390, or ANTH 490 course during their career with different titles and content.

ANTH 395. Teaching Apprenticeship. 0.5 Units.

Pass/Fail only. A teaching apprenticeship provides an opportunity for a student with an especially strong interest and ability in anthropology to achieve a deeper understanding of a given subject area by working directly with a department faculty member in the design and implementation of a course. The apprenticeship is arranged by mutual agreement between the faculty member and the student. Such an experience is especially beneficial for students who are considering university teaching as a profession. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. May be repeated once within the department.

ANTH 397. Internship in Anthropology. 0.5 or 1 Units.

This course provides an opportunity for students to enrich their classroom experiences by exploring a substantive area of anthropology in an approved setting. Typically, full unit internships require approximately 140 hours for the semester. The student intern and supervising instructor negotiate the setting, structure, requirements, and outcomes and outline them in a contract signed by the student. Basic expectations include field notes; a research paper, project, or other appropriate work product; and a letter of evaluation from the site supervisor. Students may take only one ANTH 397 course for elective anthropology credit. Prerequisite: Anthropology minor status or permission of instructor.Enrollment in an internship course requires students to attend an orientation prior to beginning work at their internship site. For more information regarding internship orientations, please contact Career & Professional Development at career@stetson.edu or 386-822-7315.

ANTH 485. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

This course is initiated by student interest and contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Students may take more than one ANTH 285, ANTH 385, or ANTH 485 course during their career with different titles and content.

ANTH 490. Special Topics in Anthropology. 1 Unit.

This course is initiated by student interest and contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Students may take more than one ANTH 290, ANTH 390, or ANTH 490 course during their career with different titles and content.