Sociology (SOCI)

SOCI 101S. Understanding Society: An Introduction to Sociology. 1 Unit.

This course surveys the major theories, research methods, and recent issues and findings in sociology. Whether exploring gender, crime, the family, religion, race, social class, social movements, or other social phenomena, students will discover how and why people behave as they do, and, in so doing, learn more about themselves and the social world. By analyzing the effects of group relations on people’s behavior; how individuals, groups, social institutions, community, and culture affect each other; and the impact of social processes on our lives, students will discern the relevance of sociology to their own lives and to fostering social justice. Note: SOCI 101S is a prerequisite to all 300- and 400- level sociology courses. Offered every fall and spring semester.

SOCI 190. Special Topic in Sociology. 0.25 to 1 Units.

SOCI 204. Contemporary Social Problems. 1 Unit.

This course focuses on the nature and the function of problems in modern society and culture. Topics covered include poverty and economic inequality, race-sex-age discrimination, media impact, changes in the family, crime, violence, and alienation from work and friends. The course ends with a look at the human condition, exploring the notion of whether we are creating a world culture. Area 2: Social Issues and Inequality course.

SOCI 215R. Population, Society, and Environment. 1 Unit.

This course analyzes population trends and phenomena in relation to their social setting and the environment; fertility, mortality, and migration as components of population change; and problems of population growth. Area 3: Social Change course.

SOCI 215V. Population, Society, Environ.. 1 Unit.

This course analyzes population trends and phenomena in relation to their social setting and the environment; fertility, mortality, and migration as components of population change; and problems of population growth. Area 3: Social Change course.

SOCI 247. Social Deviance. 1 Unit.

This course examines human social behavior that society views negatively and labels as “deviant.” It analyzes theories of social deviance and how deviance is related to conventional values, roles, and social institutions. Further, it investigates deviance as a social construction and a political phenomenon. Among the topics that may be considered are crime, delinquency, sexual deviation, and drug dependency as specific forms of deviance. Area 2: Social Issues and Inequality course.

SOCI 255S. Sociology of Families and Intimate Relationships. 1 Unit.

What is a family? How can it both provide support, love, and intimacy, and yet provoke conflict, turmoil, and violence? How do today’s families differ from those of the past? Have hooking up, cohabitation, and gay and lesbian relationships replaced traditional marriages? What consequences do such changes have for individuals and society? We will analyze the social bases of contemporary U.S. families and intimate relationships and their organization and operation as a social institution, a primary group, and a set of roles and examine the interrelatedness among gender, race/ethnicity, social class, and sexuality as central features of these phenomena. Area 1: Social Institutions course.

SOCI 270S. Sport and Society. 1 Unit.

This course familiarizes students with the main concepts, theories, research methods, and issues in the field of the sociology of sport; analyzes the social bases of sport, including the role, culture, structure, organization, and functioning of sports in contemporary society; examines social controversies in sports; explores issues of race/ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and social (in)equality in sports; and relates sport as a social institution to other social institutions. Area 1: Social Institutions course.

SOCI 276S. Sociology of Criminal Procedure. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of criminal procedure and the ways in which it is developed by the relevant state and federal caselaw. Particular focus will center on "search and seizure" and other topics that govern the police and state executive. This understanding is then applied to the ways in which the sociologist views criminal procedure’s reflexive relationship with society. Area 2: Social Issues and Inequality course.

SOCI 285. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

This course is initiated by student interest and contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Students may take more than one SOCI 285, SOCI 385, or SOCI 485 course during their career with different titles and content.

SOCI 290. Topical Seminar. 0.5 or 1 Units.

This course is initiated by student interest and contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Students may take more than one SOCI 290, SOCI 390, or SOCI 490 course during their career with different titles and content. Note: A topical seminar may count as an Area 1, Area 2, or Area 3 course for sociology majors and minors; please consult the department chairperson prior to course registration.

SOCI 302V. Criminology. 1 Unit.

This course considers the extent and nature of crime in the United States, including theories of crime causation and the nation’s response to crime via the criminal justice system (e.g., police, courts, and corrections). Prerequisite: SOCI 101S or permission of instructor. Area 2: Social Issues and Inequality course.

SOCI 304S. Social Inequality. 1 Unit.

Everyone knows that social inequalities exist, but what are the nature and extent of inequalities in the United States and the wider world? What are the social impacts of inequalities? And why do inequalities exist? Are inequalities genetic or socially-created, inevitable or reversible? This course pursues answers to these questions, exploring social class, race, and gender inequalities locally, nationally, and globally. Prerequisite: SOCI 101S or permission of instructor. Area 2: Social Issues and Inequality course.

SOCI 307V. Race, Ethnicity, & Immigration. 1 Unit.

What is the role of race, ethnicity, and immigration in U.S. society and cultures? This junior seminar examines the social construction of race and ethnicity; race, ethnicity, nationality, and immigrant status as systems of identity, interpersonal and social relations, and social structure; beliefs, images, practices, and other social forces (e.g., historical and institutional) that create, maintain, and change race and ethnicity, patterns of racial/ethnic relations, stratifying practices, and social inequality; ideology, prejudice, stereotypes, and individual and institutional discrimination; and strategies for creating a just society. Area 2: Social Issues and Inequality course. Junior Seminar.

SOCI 312V. Gender and Society. 1 Unit.

“Suck it up; be a man!” “Act like a lady!” What do these phrases mean? How do we “do” gender? This course explores the social construction and dynamics of gender; the conditions and events that shape women’s and men’s identities, interactions, and lives; and their consequences for individuals and society. It analyzes how social worlds are structured and operate as gendered phenomena and the role of culture and social movements in reinforcing or challenging existing social arrangements. The intersection of gender, race/ethnicity, social class, and sexuality are highlighted as fundamental features influencing experiences and outcomes, particularly social inequality. Prerequisite: SOCI 101S or permission of instructor. Area 2: Social Issues and Inequality course.

SOCI 337V. Sociology of Developing Societies. 1 Unit.

This course analyzes social change, social movements, social stratification, economic dependency, and political conflict in developing countries, with special emphasis on Latin America, Africa, and the African Diaspora. Prerequisite: SOCI 101S or permission of instructor. Area 3: Social Change course.

SOCI 355. Sociology of the City. 1 Unit.

This course considers the origin and growth of cities and the metropolitan community; the nature of social relations in metropolitan areas; the spatial organization of the urban community; and community problems. Prerequisite: SOCI 101S or permission of instructor. Area 3: Social Change course.

SOCI 363V. Community-Based Research. 1 Unit.

This junior seminar focuses on the uses of social science theory, methodology, and data for policy, program, planning, and evaluation applications in the community. It is designed to facilitate faculty, student, and community collaboration to plan and conduct research to address social, environmental, and/or justice issues identified by the community. Students learn to apply the theories and methods they have mastered in the classroom to real problems in the community, and communities gain access to the rich research resources of the University. The result is a powerful learning experience for students and faculty, as well as a valuable research product for communities. Junior Seminar.

SOCI 370S. Work, Occupations, and Professions. 1 Unit.

Work occupies a dominant role in our lives: it defines and identifies us, dictates how we spend our time, and significantly impacts the quality of our lives and our places in society. With changes in the global economy, many Americans experience less job security and struggle to balance the demands of work and family. This course analyzes the social organization and meaning of work and trends in occupational and industrial structures and the labor market in contemporary U.S. society. It explores the relationships among gender, race/ethnicity, and social class and work and the causes and consequences of globalization on work. Prerequisite: SOCI 101S or permission of instructor. Area 1: Social Institutions course or Area 3: Social Change course.

SOCI 375. Medicine and Health in Society. 1 Unit.

This course examines how social structure influences the occurrence of illness and why some social groups suffer more sickness and diseases than others, the experiences of illness, different models/understandings/definitions of illness and how people decide when they are sick, how they respond and cope with the symptoms of various diseases, and how they make decisions about when and from whom to seek help, and finally, the profession of medicine, types of health care providers, and medical technologies and bioethics. In the end, students will learn to appreciate the extent to which medicine and health are social constructs. Prerequisite: SOCI 101S or permission of instructor. Area 1: Social Institutions course.

SOCI 379. Sociology of Law. 1 Unit.

This course examines law as a social phenomenon and explores the relationships among law and people, social conditions, and ideas. Students systematically analyze variations in the law, identify significant social factors that account for this variation, and explore several theoretical formulations about the relationship between them. Students gain an understanding of how to make sense out of diverse empirical findings, how to more accurately predict legal variation, and how to identify new avenues of possible research. Prerequisite: SOCI 101S or permission of instructor. Area 1: Social Institutions course.

SOCI 385. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

This course is initiated by student interest and contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Students may take more than one SOCI 285, SOCI 385, or SOCI 485 course during their career with different titles and content.

SOCI 390. Topical Seminar. 1 Unit.

This course is initiated by student interest and contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Students may take more than one SOCI 290, SOCI 390, or SOCI 490 course during their career with different titles and content. Note: A topical seminar may count as an Area 1, Area 2, or Area 3 course for sociology majors and minors; please consult the department chairperson prior to course registration.

SOCI 391V. Examining a Pandemic. 1 Unit.

This junior seminar course analyzes tuberculosis (TB), one of the most deadly infectiousdiseases, globally, historically, and currently, from sociological, public health, andanthropological perspectives. Topics include the social construction and social experienceof illness, and social and structural factors contributing to TB's resurgence in poor andmarginalized groups. Area 2: Social Issues and Inequality and Area 3: Social Change.

SOCI 395. Teaching Apprenticeship. 0.5 Units.

Pass/Fail only. A teaching apprenticeship provides an opportunity for a student with an especially strong interest and ability in sociology to achieve a deeper understanding of a given subject area by working directly with a department faculty member in the design and implementation of a course. The apprenticeship is arranged by mutual agreement between the faculty member and the student. Such an experience is especially beneficial for students who are considering university teaching as a profession. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. May be repeated once within the department.

SOCI 396. Research Apprenticeship. 0.5 or 1 Units.

A student serves as an apprentice to a faculty mentor on a project that directly supports that faculty member's research agenda. Permission of instructor. Pass/Fail or letter graded; 0.5 or 1.0 units; limited to 1.0 total units to count toward the Sociology major or minor or the Anthropology minor.

SOCI 397. Internship in Sociology. 0.5 or 1 Units.

This course provides an opportunity for students to enrich their classroom experiences by exploring a substantive area of sociology in an approved setting. Typically, full unit internships require approximately 120 hours for the semester. The student intern and supervising instructor negotiate the setting, structure, requirements, and outcomes and outline them in a contract signed by the student. Basic expectations include field notes; a research paper, project, or other appropriate work product; and a letter of evaluation from the site supervisor. Sociology majors may take up to two SOCI 397 courses during their career with different titles and contents; other students may take only one SOCI 397 course for elective sociology credit. Prerequisite: SOCI 101S, major or minor status, and permission of instructor.Enrollment in an internship course requires students to attend an orientation prior to beginning work at their internship site. For more information regarding internship orientations, please contact Career & Professional Development at career@stetson.edu or 386-822-7315.

SOCI 485. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

This course is initiated by student interest and contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Students may take more than one SOCI 285, SOCI 385, or SOCI 485 course during their career with different titles and content.

SOCI 490. Topical Seminar. 1 Unit.

This course is initiated by student interest and contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Students may take more than one SOCI 290, SOCI 390, or SOCI 490 course during their career with different titles and content. Note: A topical seminar may count as an Area 1, Area 2, or Area 3 course for sociology majors and minors; please consult the department chairperson prior to course registration.

SOCI 494. Sociology and Anthropology Colloquium. 0.0 Units.

Designed to introduce Sociology and Social Science majors and Sociology and Anthropology minors to contemporary issues in Sociology and Anthropology. Structured as a weekly seminar, participants will have opportunities to discuss current events, graduate programs, jobs/careers, personal development and professional socialization. Required for Sociology/Social Science majors (must take twice, one time during the junior or senior year) and Sociology/Anthropology minors (must take once; recommended during junior year). Prerequisite: SOCI 101S or ANTH 101B.

SOCI 495. Sociological Theories. 1 Unit.

Sociological theory enables students to think more deeply about the social world, from work and religion to sex and love to prisons, politics, and global capitalism. This course explores such subjects through the ideas of major classical and contemporary sociological theorists, including Emile Durkheim, Karl Marx, Max Weber, Michel Foucault, Pierre Bourdieu, Anthony Giddens, Jurgen Habermas, and others. Theory traditions covered include conflict theory, structural-functionalist theory, rational choice theory, symbolic interactionism, and theories of modernity and postmodernity. Offered every fall semester; should be taken in the junior year. Prerequisites: SOCI 101S and 2 other courses in sociology. Co-requisite: SOCI 496. Prerequisite to SOCI 497, SOCI 498Q, and SOCI 499.

SOCI 496. Social Research Methods. 1 Unit.

This course studies the processes of social inquiry and introduces research methods for the social sciences, with particular attention to the design and execution of quantitative and qualitative social research, including the nature, goals, and logic of social research and the structure and processes of inquiry. Topics include problem formulation; causation; the role of theory in social research; conceptualization, operationalization, and measurement; reliability and validity; sampling; quantitative and qualitative methods of data collection; coding; introduction to data analysis; and ethical and political issues of social research. Offered every fall semester; should be taken in the junior year. Prerequisites: SOCI 101S and 2 other courses in sociology. Co-requisite: SOCI 495. Prerequisite to SOCI 497, SOCI 498Q, and SOCI 499.

SOCI 497. Methods and Styles of Social Science Communication. 1 Unit.

This course emphasizes writing various types of social science documents (such as book and journal reviews, abstracts, annotated bibliographies, and the required proposal for the research thesis); communicating with lay audiences; and delivering professional presentations of scholarly work. A major component of the course is preparation of the written research proposal that serves as the basis for the senior research project in SOCI 499. Students orally present their proposals for departmental approval. Offered every spring semester; should be taken in the junior year. Prerequisites: SOCI 101S, SOCI 495, and SOCI 496. Co-requisite: SOCI 498Q. Prerequisite to SOCI 499. (This course is open to other social science majors and minors, with permission of the instructor.) Writing enhanced course.

SOCI 498Q. Tools for Quantitative Analysis. 1 Unit.

This course introduces applied statistical concepts and emphasizes the use of bivariate and multivariate statistical procedures for analyzing sample survey data. Offered every spring semester; should be taken in the junior year. Prerequisites: SOCI 101S, SOCI 495, and SOCI 496. Co-requisite: SOCI 497. Prerequisite to SOCI 499. (This course is open to other social science majors and minors, with permission of the instructor. If sociology majors fulfill this requirement through an approved statistics course in another department, another sociology course must be substituted in its place.).

SOCI 499. Senior Project. 1 Unit.

In this research course, students execute the research project they proposed in SOCI 497 and present the findings of their studies in an oral presentation and in a written report which contains an abstract; a problem statement and research objectives or hypotheses; identification of the main concepts and variables, including their definition, operationalization, and measurement; a review of the pertinent theoretical and empirical literature; a description of the study design and execution; findings and their interpretation; summary, conclusions, implications, and suggestions for further research; a bibliography; and a copy of the research instrument. Offered every fall semester; should be taken in the senior year. Prerequisites: SOCI 101S, SOCI 495, SOCI 496, SOCI 497, and SOCI 498Q. (If sociology majors fulfill this requirement through a course in another department, another sociology course must be substituted in its place.).