Graduate Education in the Department of English

Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) in Creative Writing

The Stetson Low-Residency M.F.A. of the Americas is a two-year hybrid program consisting of classroom and online work culminating in a master's degree in one of two genres: Fiction or Poetry in an Expanded Field.

Admission Requirements    

  • Earned undergraduate degree from a college or university accredited by the appropriate regional association, with a minimum grade point average of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale
  • Completion of application
  • Application fee
  • Official transcripts from all previous universities or colleges attended
  • Three completed recommendation forms
  • Work Sample – (Poetry in an Expanded Field: 8-10 pages or the equivalent) or (Fiction:15-25 pages of double-spaced prose)
  • Personal Statement – 1-2 pages or a 1-3 minute video explaining why you want to be considered.

All international applicants whose native language is not English are required to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and submit a combined score of 550 or better (new scoring of 213 or better) or the Internet-based test scoring of 80 or better. Please contact the Office of Graduate Admissions for additional information.

Degree in Creative Writing

Ballenger, Grady
Professor of English, 1998
A.B., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
M.A., Columbia University
Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Barber, Nancy
Sullivan Visiting Lecturer in English, 1998
A.B., Davidson College
M.A., Stetson University
M.F.A., University of Florida

Barnes, Michael C.
Associate Professor of English, 2001
B.A., M.A., Clemson University
Ph.D., University of South Carolina

Campbell, Shawnrece D.
Associate Professor of English, 2002 
B.A., John Carroll University
M.A., Youngstown State University
Ph.D., Kent State University

Davis, Joel
Professor of English, 2002
B.A., University of Puget Sound
M.A., University of Wyoming
Ph.D., University of Oregon

Denner, Nicole
Visiting Assistant Professor of English, 2011
B.A., M.A., Indiana University 
Ph.D., Northwestern University

Farrell, Thomas J.
Professor of English and Chair, 1984
J. Ollie Edmunds Chair of English, 2014
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan

Houston, David
Visiting Assistant Professor of English and Modern Languages and Literatures, 2013
B.A., Stetson University
M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison

O’Neill, Megan
Associate Professor of English, 1999
Director of the University Writing Program
B.A., M.A., Eastern Washington University
Ph.D., University of New Mexico

Pearson, John H.
Professor of English, 1988
Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs, 2014

B.A., Eckerd College
M.A., Ph.D., Boston University

Pollock, Mary R.
Professor of English, 1985
Nell Carlton Chair of English, 2010

B.A., University of Tennessee
M.A., Texas A & I University
Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin

Powell, Mark
Associate Professor of English, 2008
B.A., The Citadel
M.F.A., University of South Carolina
M.A.R., Yale Divinity School

Radley, Gail
Sullivan Visiting Lecturer in English, 1998
B.A., Mary Baldwin College
M.A., Stetson University

Snook, Lori
Associate Professor of English, 1992
B.A., M.A., University of Oklahoma
Ph.D., University of Arizona

Witek, Therese D.
Professor of English, 1989
Art and Melissa Sullivan Chair in Creative Writing, 2005

B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Vanderbilt University

ENCW 511. Non-Fiction Workshop. 3 Credits.

Focuses on various non-fiction prose techniques using a variety of expressive, transactional, and poetic modes. This course may include the writing of an array of creative non-fiction genres such as memoirs, personal essays, literary journalism, cultural criticism, or nature writing.

ENCW 512. Fiction Workshop. 3 Credits.

Develops student skills in such fiction techniques as characterization, plot, setting, point of view, and style.

ENCW 513. Poetry Workshop. 3 Credits.

Develops student skills in poetry. Permission of instructor required.

ENCW 518. Major Project Workshop I. 0 Credits.

Part one of a genre-specific year-long course in which students will begin and complete a major work.

ENCW 519. Major Project Workshop II. 3 Credits.

Part two of a genre-specific year-long course in which students will begin and complete a major work. Prerequisite: ENCW 518.

ENCW 612. Fiction: Introductory Course. 10 Credits.

Fiction cohort meets in the US for introductory 10-day workshop and immersion experience. Students subsequently develop individual reading lists, choose exemplary models, and produce original work (short fiction or novel chapters). 4 individual online packets (each the equivalent of 20-25 pages of prose) exchanged with instructor over the 6-month session. Hours: 1 hr. onsite + 9 off-site = 10.

ENCW 613. Poetry in an Expanded Field: Introductory Course. 10 Credits.

PIA(E)F cohort meets in the US for introductory 10-day workshop and immersion experience. Students subsequently develop individual reading lists, choose exemplary models, and experiment with different ways of poetic making/writing. 4 individual online packets (each the equivalent of 8-10 pieces) exchanged with instructor over the 6-month session. Hours: 1 hr. onsite + 9 off-site + 10.

ENCW 614. Fiction: Intermediate Course. 11 Credits.

Fiction cohort meets abroad for a 10 day cross-cultural workshop and immersion experience. Students subsequently add cross-cultural reading to their reading lists and continue to produce original fiction. 4 individual online packet exchanges with instructor over the 6-month session. Hours: 2 hrs. onsite + 9 off-site = 11.

ENCW 615. Poetry in an Expanded Field: Intermediate Course. 11 Credits.

PIA(E)F cohort meets abroad for a 10 day cross-cultural workshop and immersion experience. Students subsequently add cross-cultural reading to their reading lists and begin to choose and implement individual methods of poetic production. 4 individual online packet exchanges with instructor over the 6-month session. Hours: 2 hrs. onsite + 9 off-site = 11.

ENCW 616. Fiction: Advanced Course. 11 Credits.

Fiction cohort reconvenes for a second US 10-day workshop and immersion experience. Students subsequently add new reading in a chosen direction and begin to outline final project (either a collection of stories or a novel). 4 individual online packet exchanges with instructor over the 6-month session focus on refining skills and revision. Hours: 2 hrs. onsite + 9 off-site = 11.

ENCW 617. Poetry in an Expanded Field: Advanced Course. 11 Credits.

PIA(E)F cohort reconnoiters for a second US 10-day workshop and immersion experience. Students subsequently add new reading in a chosen direction and begin to outline final projects. 4 individual online packet exchanges with instructor over the 6-month session focus on extending poetic skills and revision. Hours: 2 hrs. onsite + 9 off-site = 11.

ENCW 618. Fiction: Final Project Course. 12 Credits.

Fiction cohort meets for a final time abroad for a 10 day cross-cultural workshop and immersion experience. Students subsequently complete cross-cultural work and concentrate on moving their original material through revisions. 4 individual online packet exchanges with instructor over the 6-month session, culminating in the equivalent of a novel or story collection presented at the next in country residency. Hours: 3 hrs. onsite + 9 off-site = 12.

ENCW 619. Poetry in an Expanded Field: Final Project Course. 12 Credits.

PIA(E)F cohort meets for a final time abroad for a 10 day cross-cultural workshop and immersion experience. Students subsequently complete cross-cultural work and concentrate on moving their original material through revisions. 4 individual online packet exchanges with instructor over the 6-month session, culminating in the equivalent of a book-length poetic project presented at the next in country residency. Hours: 3 hrs. onsite + 9 off-site = 12.

ENCW 685. Independent Study. 1 to 3 Credit.

ENCW 695. Independent Study. 1 to 3 Credit.

ENGL 505. Special Topics in Journalism. 3 Credits.

ENGL 520. History and Theory of Rhetoric. 3 Credits.

Focuses on Western rhetorical history and theory, moving from classical through Romantic to modern eras. Course examines contributions made by major figures (such as Plato, Coleridge, Nietzsche, and Cixous) and issues of authority in discourse. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 320.

ENGL 521. Old English. 3 Credits.

Introduces students to the language written in England between 500 and 1100. Emphasis is placed on developing a basic reading knowledge of the language. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 421.

ENGL 522. Composition Pedagogy. 3 Credits.

Balancing an overview of the research and theories of Composition Studies with teaching experiences, this course provides a firm foundation in writing instruction and the epistemologies that govern varied pedagogical approaches. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 322.

ENGL 523. Ethnography in Composition Studies. 3 Credits.

After a review of ethnographic research methodology and macro-ethnographies in Composition Studies, students pursue their own qualitative projects, including phases of research design, data collection, analysis, and a final descriptive presentation of results. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 323.

ENGL 524. Special Methods in Middle and High School English. 3 Credits.

Emphasizes the skills, processes, and pedagogical strategies relevant to teaching English to children in grades 6-12. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 321.

ENGL 525. Grammar and Rhetoric. 3 Credits.

Studies grammar in English, emphasizing analysis of syntax and semantics, touching on elements of linguistics and language acquisition, and incorporating as appropriate insights from structural and transformational grammars. Writing enhanced course. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 325.

ENGL 526. History of the English Language. 3 Credits.

Studies the ways in which Modern English arose, the linguistic and social forces that shaped it, and the nature of its current use throughout the world. Consistent attention is given to phonology, lexis, structure, variation, and language attitudes in the various historical periods. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 326H.

ENGL 527. Classical Rhetoric. 3 Credits.

Applying the conflict between the sophists and platonists regarding the relationship between rhetoric, knowledge, and ethics as an informing debate, this course will survey the theories and historical context of important Greek and Roman rhetoricians. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 426.

ENGL 528. Modern Rhetoric. 3 Credits.

Focuses on significant developments in Western rhetoric's treatment of ethics, truth, and power since approximately 1900. Beginning with Friedrich Nietzsche, whose work in the rhetoric of power marks the beginning of modern rhetoric, the course also includes study of Kenneth Burke, I. A. Richards, Stephen Toulmin, and other important figures in rhetorical theory. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 427.

ENGL 531. Literature, Culture and Society. 3 Credits.

Considers relationships among literary texts, culture, and society. Emphasis varies. A course might examine literature through the lens of sociocultural or political perspectives; investigate how texts represent the social, cultural, or political ideas of an era; or explore the relation of aesthetic form to socio-cultural movements or phenomena. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 331.

ENGL 532. Studies in Literature and the Arts. 3 Credits.

Provides an examination of a theme, period, movement, or topic of particular relevance to the interdisciplinary study of literature and such arts as painting, photography, architecture, or music. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 332.

ENGL 535. Film Studies. 3 Credits.

Focuses on one or more topics in the study of film (often but not exclusively defined by periods, genres, directors/schools, or theoretical approaches) as indicated by the subtitle. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 335.

ENGL 546. Survey of British Literature I. 3 Credits.

Surveys major authors and representative works in British Literature from the seventh to the eighteenth century. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 346.

ENGL 547. Survey of British Literature II. 3 Credits.

Surveys major authors and representative works in British Literature from the eighteenth century to the present. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 347.

ENGL 548. Survey of U.S. Literatures. 3 Credits.

Surveys United States literatures from pre-Colonial times to the present. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 348.

ENGL 550. Survey in a Literary Period. 3 Credits.

Offers an advanced historical approach to the study of literature in a single period. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 450. May be repeated for credit, provided that different literary periods are covered.

ENGL 551. Medieval Literature. 3 Credits.

Considers the literature of England between 700 and 1500, with attention to textual, social, cultural, and formal issues. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 350.

ENGL 552. Renaissance Literature. 3 Credits.

Surveys significant literary trends in their cultural context during the English Renaissance, c. 1509-1674. It may attend to questions of gender, race, class, and the division between popular and high cultures; may also include some works of Continental literature influential in Renaissance England. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 351.

ENGL 553. Restoration and 18th Century Literature. 3 Credits.

Presents selections from English drama, poetry, fiction, and non-fiction of the Restoration and 18th Century, with attention to form, language, publication/performance, and social-cultural contexts. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 352.

ENGL 554. 19th Century British Literature. 3 Credits.

Focuses on major themes and cultural movements of the period, giving attention to canonical works and authors, and to lesser known authors whose work was influential during the nineteenth century. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 353.

ENGL 555. 19th Century Lit in the U.S.. 3 Credits.

Addresses major themes and movements in U.S. literature of the 1800s, covering both canonical works and authors and influential lesser known authors. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 354.

ENGL 556. British Literature Since 1900. 3 Credits.

Considers a theme, period, movement, or topic of particular relevance to British literature of the 20-21st centuries. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 355.

ENGL 557. U.S. Literature since 1900. 3 Credits.

Focuses on writers in the United States since 1900. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 356.

ENGL 558. Contemporary Literature. 3 Credits.

Examines emerging developments, forms, themes, and ideas in literatures of our time. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 357.

ENGL 560. Genre Study Seminar. 3 Credits.

Offers an advanced study of one or more genres in historically significant or typical examples. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 460. May be repeated for credit, provided that second and succeeding 560 courses cover substantially different genres.

ENGL 561. Studies in Non-Fiction. 3 Credits.

Offers advanced study of one or more forms of non-fiction, such as autobiography, the personal essay, creative non-fiction, or spiritual texts. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 360.

ENGL 562. Studies in Narrative. 3 Credits.

Offers advanced study of one or more narrative forms, such as the novel, the long poem, epic, saga, or romance. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 361.

ENGL 563. Studies in Lyric. 3 Credits.

Focuses on a genre, period, movement, or critical issue in lyric. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 362.

ENGL 564. Studies in Drama. 3 Credits.

Focuses on a genre, period, movement, or critical issue in drama. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 363.

ENGL 565. Author Studies. 3 Credits.

This course will focus on the work of a single author or a small group of associated authors. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 365 or ENGL 465.

ENGL 566. Shakespeare. 3 Credits.

Introduces students to a broad selection of Shakespeare’s plays and may also include attention to non-dramatic works. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 366 or ENGL 465.

ENGL 567. Austen. 3 Credits.

Examines Austen’s work, focusing on issues of style and form as well as social and political context. It may consider recent film adaptations of Austen’s novels, as well. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 367 or ENGL 465.

ENGL 570. Ethnic American Literature. 3 Credits.

Focuses on the issues, history, and aesthetics of one or more Ethnic American literature of the U.S. Examples might include African American, Asian American, or Native American literature. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 370 or ENGL 470.

ENGL 571. Africana Literature. 3 Credits.

Focuses on the literature of one or more African populations throughout the African diaspora (the forced or voluntary dispersal of Africans throughout the world). Offered in conjunction with ENGL 371.

ENGL 572. Gender in Literature Seminar. 3 Credits.

Offers advanced analysis of gender or sexuality as a theme in literary or extra-literary texts. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 472.

ENGL 573. Global Literature Seminar. 3 Credits.

Examines representative works of world literature, both Western and non-Western, in English and in translation, with consideration of their aesthetic, cultural, historical, and literary contexts. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 473 or ENGL 474.

ENGL 574. Popular Culture Seminar. 3 Credits.

Offers advanced study of popular cultural forms, including popular literary genres (detective fiction, romance novels, fantasy and science fiction), film and television, and material culture. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 475.

ENGL 575. Comics. 3 Credits.

Examines comic strips, comic books, bande dessinée, manga, and other texts that combine words and images. It may consider historical, formal, aesthetic, and cultural aspects of the topic. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 375.

ENGL 576. Interdisciplinary Seminar. 3 Credits.

Offers advanced topical, focused study of literature in the context of other disciplines or forms of expression in the arts, humanities, or sciences. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 476.

ENGL 581. Text-Criticism-Theory. 3 Credits.

Delineates differences among the disciplinary practices of reading, interpretation, and theorizing by attending to a limited number of texts, critical interpretations of those texts, and theoretical arguments arising from or repositioning those texts. Required for the English major. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 381.

ENGL 582. Theory Seminar. 3 Credits.

Offers advanced study of one or more theorists, theoretical movements, or theoretical questions. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 481.

ENGL 583. Composition and Rhetoric Seminar. 3 Credits.

Offers advanced consideration of specific topics of interest to the interdisciplinary study of rhetoric and composition. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 482.

ENGL 585. Independent Study. 3 Credits.

ENGL 590. Seminar in a Literary Topic. 3 Credits.

May be repeated for credit. Offered in conjunction with ENGL 490.

ENGL 595. Teaching Apprenticeship. 3 Credits.

Students who are asked to be co-teachers for First Year Seminars or other courses will help to plan syllabi, present course material, and respond to written work.

ENGL 600. Graduate Colloquium. 3 Credits.

Extends the student’s familiarity with the concepts and general approaches to graduate level literary study, and to advance abilities in reading texts and in literary research and writing. A required lecture/discussion foundations course offered every third semester.

ENGL 620. Topics in Composition and Rhetoric. 3 Credits.

Focuses on one or more questions from the history of rhetoric, rhetorical theory, composition theory, or composition pedagogy.

ENGL 625. Topics in English Language. 3 Credits.

Studies one or more questions in the history, structure, usage, acquisition, or grammar of English.

ENGL 630. Topics in Literature and Culture. 3 Credits.

Considers relationships among literary texts, culture, and society.

ENGL 635. Film Studies. 3 Credits.

Focuses on one or more topics in the study of film (often but not exclusively defined by periods, genres, directors/schools, or theoretical approaches) as indicated by the subtitle.

ENGL 646. Survey of British Literature I. 3 Credits.

Surveys major authors and representative works in British Literature from the seventh to the eighteenth century.

ENGL 647. Survey of British Literature II. 3 Credits.

Surveys major authors and representative works in British Literature from the eighteenth century to the present.

ENGL 648. Survey of U.S. Literature. 3 Credits.

Surveys United States literatures from pre-Colonial times to the present.

ENGL 650. Topic in a Literary Period. 3 Credits.

Offers an advanced historical approach to the study of literature in a single period. May be repeated for credit, provided that second and succeeding courses cover different literary periods.

ENGL 660. Topic in Genre Study. 3 Credits.

Offers an advanced study of one or more genres in historically significant or typical examples. May be repeated for credit, provided that second and succeeding courses cover substantially different literary genres.

ENGL 665. Topic in Author Study. 3 Credits.

Offers advanced study of the works of a single author or a small group of associated authors, with consideration of biographical, historical, theoretical, and other relevant issues.

ENGL 670. Topic in Ethnic Literature. 3 Credits.

Offers advanced study of the literature of ethnically diverse populations in the U.S. or the world. May be repeated for credit, provided that second and succeeding courses cover different ethnic literatures.

ENGL 672. Topic in Gender Studies. 3 Credits.

Offers advanced analysis of gender or sexuality as a theme in literary or extra-literary texts.

ENGL 673. Topic in Global Literature. 3 Credits.

Examines representative works of world literature, both Western and non-Western, in English and in translation, with consideration of their aesthetic, cultural, historical, and literary contexts.

ENGL 675. Topic in Popular Culture. 3 Credits.

Offers advanced study of popular cultural forms, including popular literary genres (detective fiction, romance novels, fantasy and science fiction), film and television, and material culture.

ENGL 676. Interdisciplinary Topic. 3 Credits.

Offers advanced topical, focused study of literature in the context of other disciplines or forms of expression in the arts, humanities, or sciences.

ENGL 681. Topic in Theory. 3 Credits.

Offers advanced study of one or more theorists, theoretical movements, or theoretical questions. Fulfills the Theory/Criticism requirement.

ENGL 685. Independent Study. 1 to 3 Credit.

ENGL 698. Directed Research. 3 Credits.

One semester course of independent research under the guidance of the thesis committee leading to the thesis. Prerequisite: ENGL 600. Also requires permission of the instructor (the thesis director).

ENGL 699. Thesis. 3 Credits.

A scholarly paper of publishable quality, researched and directed under a professor chosen by the student, on a mutually agreed upon topic. Prerequisite: ENGL 698.