Psychology (PSYC)

Courses

PSYC 101S. Introduction to Psychology. 1 Unit.

This course looks at the ways in which questions about human behavior and mental life are explored by psychologists, what they are discovering, and how they have put some of their answers into action. Using several perspectives prominent in the field of psychology, the course examines representative areas such as perception, the nervous system, states of consciousness, emotion, stress and coping, learning, memory, personality, abnormal psychology, psychotherapy, social processes, and human development. Required course for the major and minor. Offered every semester. PSYC 101S is a prerequisite for many other psychology courses.

PSYC 175. Seminar. 1 Unit.

Like special topics courses, seminars are designed to extend the range of the curriculum and give students an opportunity to explore special topics. The principal difference is in the format. Seminars are necessarily limited to a small size because they devote class time almost entirely to collaborative interaction among the faculty member(s) and students involved in the course. Any prerequisites will be indicated in the course schedule.

PSYC 185. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

Independent studies are intended to provide an opportunity for students with strong interest and initiative to pursue the study of topics that are not part of the regular course offerings. They are arranged by mutual agreement between faculty member and student. Before agreeing to supervise an independent study, ordinarily a faculty member will ask the student to present a clear, written proposal for the work to be completed. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

PSYC 190. Special Topics in Psychology. 0.5 to 1 Units.

These lecture/discussion courses are designed to extend the range of the curriculum and give students an opportunity to explore special topics. Such topics, which may vary from semester to semester, might include, for example, particular theorists, distinctive theoretical perspectives, specific problems, or particular areas of research. Any prerequisites will be indicated in the course schedule.

PSYC 203. Great Experiments in Psychology. 1 Unit.

The innovative history of psychological research is explored in this course by closely examining classic studies that have influenced our concepts of mind and behavior. Emphasis is placed on both the methodological approaches used in these studies and the findings stemming from them. The ongoing influence of these classic works is illuminated by discussion of more recent investigations that have their roots in the original research. Course assignments introduce students to research methods, statistical analyses and writing in the discipline. Required course for the major. Should be completed by the end of the sophomore year.Prerequisite: PSYC 101S. Writing enhanced course. Offered every semester.

PSYC 211. Biological Psychology. 1 Unit.

This course approaches the study of mind and behavior from a biological perspective, with special attention to the brain processes that underlie sensory, behavioral, and cognitive functions. The course begins with an overview of the structure and function of the nervous system and then explores in more detail the role of the nervous system in eating, sleeping, sex, emotions, stress, language, learning and memory, and mental disorders. Prerequisites: BIOL 121P or BIOL 141P and BIOL 142P. Offered once per year.

PSYC 221. Cognitive Psychology. 1 Unit.

This course explores the cognitive processes that are involved in attention, sensation, perception, memory, language, reading, problem solving, and decision making. Students will also explore how theory and research relate to daily activities, such as reading, driving, studying, evaluating memory, and making complex decisions. Students will gain hands-on experience with these processes by participating in basic cognitive experiments, analyzing their data, and writing up lab reports. Prerequisite: PSYC 101S. Offered at least once per year.

PSYC 231. Developmental Psychology. 1 Unit.

This course explores human development across the life-span, typically including consideration of theories of development, genetic and prenatal influences on behavior, childbirth and the newborn, perceptual and motor development, cognitive processes and academic skills, intelligence, language development, temperament and emotional development, moral development, the attachment relationship and social development, the family, and adult development and aging. Prerequisite: PSYC 101S. Offered every semester.

PSYC 241. Social Psychology. 1 Unit.

Social psychology asks how the presence of others, real or implied, affects the behavior of the individual. The course considers experimental techniques used for social psychological data; how social beliefs, perceptions, and attitudes affect and are affected by our behavior; cultural influence, conformity, persuasion, group dynamics, and the application of social psychology to legal situations; the operation and consequences of prejudice, aggression, attraction, and altruism and how these factors may play a role in the management of social conflict. The primary goal is to increase the student's appreciation of the power of social forces in determining behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC 101S. Offered every semester.

PSYC 242. Theories and Research in Personality. 1 Unit.

The field of personality focuses primarily on explaining individual differences in behavior. This course introduces students to the diverse ways of conceptualizing, assessing, and studying personality so as to enhance the student's appreciation of the multifaceted nature of behavior. It emphasizes the variety of options and possibilities for analyzing and evaluating individual differences and applies empirical findings to everyday life. Prerequisite: PSYC 101S. Offered every semester.

PSYC 251V. Abnormal Psychology. 1 Unit.

This course focuses on Stetson's Human Diversity Value. This course provides an overview of the field of abnormal psychology. The major psychological disorders, including schizophrenia, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, somatoform and dissociative disorders, personality disorders, eating disorders, substance-related disorders, and sexual and gender identity disorders, are explored from biological, psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, and sociocultural perspectives. The investigation of each disorder covers symptoms, contributing factors, and treatment options. Prerequisite: PSYC 101S. Offered every semester.

PSYC 275. Seminar. 1 Unit.

Like special topics courses, seminars are designed to extend the range of the curriculum and give students an opportunity to explore special topics. The principal difference is in the format. Seminars are necessarily limited to a small size because they devote class time almost entirely to collaborative interaction among the faculty member(s) and students involved in the course. Any prerequisites will be indicated in the course schedule.

PSYC 285. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

Independent studies are intended to provide an opportunity for students with strong interest and initiative to pursue the study of topics that are not part of the regular course offerings. They are arranged by mutual agreement between faculty member and student. Before agreeing to supervise an independent study, ordinarily a faculty member will ask the student to present a clear, written proposal for the work to be completed. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

PSYC 290. Special Topics in Psychology. 1 Unit.

These lecture/discussion courses are designed to extend the range of the curriculum and give students an opportunity to explore special topics. Such topics, which may vary from semester to semester, might include, for example, particular theorists, distinctive theoretical perspectives, specific problems, or particular areas of research. Any prerequisites will be indicated in the course schedule.

PSYC 297V. Ethical and Professional Issues in Psychology: Internship. 1 Unit.

The classroom and internship components of this course are designed to deepen student understanding of the ethical issues central to the field of psychology in both research and practice. The internship allows students to obtain real-world experience useful in pursuing further vocational and educational opportunities. Students are required to complete 120 hours in an approved internship setting over the course of the semester. Offered once a year, typically in the spring semester. Prerequisite: PSYC 101S.

PSYC 306Q. Behavioral Statistics. 1 Unit.

In this course, students will learn basic principles of descriptive and inferential statistics and how to apply them in empirical psychological research. Univariate and multivariate applications include t-tests, factorial and repeated measures ANOVA, correlation, X2, and linear and logistic regression. Students will also learn to identify appropriate statistical approaches based on research hypotheses, study design, and measurement scales and how to report and interpret statistical results when writing APA style reports. Required for the major. To be completed int he junior year. Prerequisites: MATH 125Q, PSYC 203. Offered every semester.

PSYC 313V. Drugs, Mind and Behavior. 1 Unit.

This course focuses on Stetson's Health and Wellness Value. This course focuses on Stetson's Health and Wellness Value. This course helps students understand the effects of drug use - legal and illegal - on the individual. It explores drug actions on brain function, their short-term effects on mind and behavior, as well as the possible long-term consequences of drug exposure, including tolerance, dependence, and drug addiction. The course also examines other key factors that can influence drug effects, including characteristics of the user, drug expectancies, and the role of the environment. Offered every semester.

PSYC 322. Memory in Everyday Life. 1 Unit.

This course will explore the memory issues faced by people in everyday life, including the recollection of past events, judging memory accuracy, flashbulb memories, eyewitness testimony, trauma and repression, and disorders of memory. Students will critically analyze historical events, criminal trials, and their own memories to learn more about memory processes. This course is a mixture of lecture and discussions of experiments, readings, and videos. Prerequisite: PSYC 101S. Offered at least once a year. Writing Enhanced course.

PSYC 332. Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood. 1 Unit.

This course considers the sociological, biological and emotional processes that occur between puberty and young adulthood, ages 10-25. Topics covered include psychosocial development, sexuality, role exploration, as well cross-cultural conceptualizations of adolescence. This course will also consider emerging adulthood as the period extending from adolescence into the 20s and shifts in role occurring during this developmental period. Prerequisite: PSYC 101S. Offered at least once per year.

PSYC 334. Adult Development and Aging. 1 Unit.

This course examines biological, cognitive, emotional, and developmental processes occurring throughout adulthood. Relationships and sexuality, careers and work life, parenthood, friendship, leisure, retirement, and healthy aging and longevity are discussed. Topics will also include mental illness and neurodegenerative conditions. Life-role changes and their psychosocial and emotional impact are highlighted. Knowledge gained from this course will apply to practical, ethical, and policy implications related to adulthood and aging. Prerequisite: PSYC 101S. Offered at least once per year.

PSYC 335V. Interpersonal Dynamics. 1 Unit.

This course focuses on Stetson's Human Diversity Value. The student learns more about personality and interpersonal behavior, including his or her own, through firsthand experience in a laboratory setting. The course is unusual in its format. After the first day, we meet each time as a self-observational group in which each member of the group assumes responsibility for contributing to the development of a shared understanding of the processes occurring within the group. In readings and papers, students become familiar with a variety of theoretical perspectives and observational methods useful in understanding the processes occurring in the group. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and permission of instructor.

PSYC 343. Industrial and Organizational Psychology. 1 Unit.

This course applies psychological principles to people in the workplace. Topics such as motivation and job satisfaction, communication and conflict management, working conditions, safety and health in the workplace, and work-related stress are included. Employee law, the employee selection and appraisal process, employee training and development, and leadership are also discussed. Contemporary issues are examined. Prerequisite:.PSYC 101S. Offered at least once per year.

PSYC 350V. Human Behavior During the Zombie Apocalypse. 1 Unit.

This course focuses on Stetson's Health and Wellness Value. It focuses on how humans behave in catastrophic times with an emphasis on survival during a potential zombie apocalypse. We will examine past catastrophic events (including natural disasters and epidemics) as examples of what might happen during a zombie apocalypse and emphasize how we can facilitate preparedness for future catastrophes. Literary and media depictions of zombies will be used to illustrate course material. Offered at least once per year.Junior Seminar.

PSYC 352V. Health Psychology. 1 Unit.

This course focuses on Stetson's Health and Wellness Value. This course provides an overview of psychological theory, research, and practice concerning the prevention of illness and promotion of health. The role of health psychologists as clinicians and researchers will be emphasized. Students will design and implement a health promotion/illness prevention program. Topics like stress management and sexual risk behavior reduction will be covered. Prerequisite: PSYC 101S. Offered at least once per year.

PSYC 353. Forensic Psychology. 1 Unit.

The intent of this course is to examine research on criminal perpetrators. The course will also cover the involvement of psychology in the criminal justice system ranging from psychological evaluations of offenders, insanity defenses and criminal profiling. The course will consider criminal offenses ranging from drug offenses through domestic violence, rape and serial murder. Offered at least once per yer.

PSYC 361V. Look Into the Mirror: Psychological Perspectives of Fairness and Justice. 1 Unit.

This course focuses on Stetson's Social Justice Value. This course covers what psychological science has to say about bias, such as identifying the sociocultural, cognitive, and evolutionary influences that foster bias. Students will be encouraged to seek out historical context and empirical evidence to understand why prejudice occurs and how to reduce it. Emphasis will be placed on honest self-reflection and listening to those whose experiences are different. Junior Seminar.

PSYC 362V. The Science of Body Image. 1 Unit.

This course focuses on Stetson's Health and Wellness Value. Appearance matters… or does it? Physical appearance undoubtedly impacts the way people perceive us, but holding unhealthy attitudes about our bodies can negatively affect mental and physical health. In this course, we will examine how scholars in fields like psychology, gender studies, neuroscience, and health sciences have contributed to our understanding of body image – how people think and feel about the way they look. Course topics include influences on body image (e.g., family, peers, media, sports/exercise participation), the way body image impacts our well-being, body image in diverse groups, and the prevention and treatment of body image disturbance and related concerns. Junior Seminar.

PSYC 363V. Emotions: The Science Behind Why We Feel. 1 Unit.

This course focuses on Stetson's Health and Wellness Value. It focuses on the research process in the context of both classic and contemporary theories of human emotion. Students will learn about the study of emotions in the context of multiple disciplines, including psychology, sociology, and neuroscience. This course will help students become more informed consumers of research and develop their ability to discuss research as they learn about the function of emotion, how emotion is expressed and regulated, and physiological and cultural aspects of emotion. Offered at least once every two years. Junior Seminar.

PSYC 364V. Game of Thrones Made Me Do It: Media's Impact on Behavior. 1 Unit.

This course focuses on Stetson's Health and Wellness Value. This course will examine the interaction between media and media consumers. The degree to which individuals shape media and media shapes individual behavior will be discussed. Specific topic areas will include the influence of media on aggression and violence, sexual behavior and pregnancy, body dissatisfaction, eating behaviors and gender roles. The course will consider the impact of video games, social media, television, advertising, pornography and other media. Offered at least once every two years. Junior Seminar.

PSYC 375. Seminar. 1 Unit.

Like special topics courses, seminars are designed to extend the range of the curriculum and give students an opportunity to explore special topics. The principal difference is in the format. Seminars are necessarily limited to a small size because they devote class time almost entirely to collaborative interaction among the faculty member(s) and students involved in the course. Any prerequisites will be indicated in the course schedule.

PSYC 385. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

Independent studies are intended to provide an opportunity for students with strong interest and initiative to pursue the study of topics that are not part of the regular course offerings. They are arranged by mutual agreement between faculty member and student. Before agreeing to supervise an independent study, ordinarily a faculty member will ask the student to present a clear, written proposal for the work to be completed. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

PSYC 389. Undergraduate Research. 0.5 or 1 Units.

Pass/Fail only. Students in this course will participate in the activities of a research lab conducting original psychological research. This course runs on an apprenticeship model in which students will perform duties essential for the lab under the professor’s guidance. Activities may include running research participants, administering psychological surveys, collecting, entering and analyzing data and assisting with the dissemination of research findings through conference presentations and publications. Specific duties will be at the discretion of the instructor. Prerequisite: PSYC 203 with a grade of B or higher.

PSYC 390. Special Topics in Psychology. 1 Unit.

These lecture/discussion courses are designed to extend the range of the curriculum and give students an opportunity to explore special topics. Such topics, which may vary from semester to semester, might include, for example, particular theorists, distinctive theoretical perspectives, specific problems, or particular areas of research. Any prerequisites will be indicated in the course schedule.

PSYC 391V. The Psychology of Bias. 1 Unit.

This course focuses on Stetson's Social Justice Value. This course covers what psychological science has to say about bias and prejudice, including identifying sociocultural, cognitive, and evolutionary influences on attitudes and perception. Students will be encouraged to seek out historical context and empirical evidence to understand why prejudice and discrimination occur and how to reduce it. Emphasis will be placed on honest self-reflection and listening to those whose experiences are different to encourage a disposition in favor of fairness and social justice.

PSYC 395. Teaching Apprenticeship. 0.5 Units.

Pass/Fail only. A teaching apprenticeship provides an opportunity for a student with especially strong interest and ability in a given subject area to achieve an even deeper understanding by being directly involved with a faculty member in the design and implementation of a course. The apprenticeship is arranged by mutual agreement between the faculty member and the student. Such an experience is especially beneficial for students who are considering university teaching as a profession. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. May be repeated once.

PSYC 397. Internship in Psychology II. 0.5 or 1 Units.

Pass/Fail only. (.5 or 1 unit). This course gives students who have already completed PSYC 296V an opportunity to do a second internship that will be useful in pursuing further vocational and educational opportunities.This course does not include a classroom component. Studentscomplete either 70 hrs (.5 unit) or 140 hours (1 unit) in an approved internship setting over the course of the semester. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: PSYC 296V AND Permission of the Instructor. Offered at least once per year. Enrollment in an internship course requires students to attend an orientation prior to beginning work at their internship site. For more information regarding internship orientations, please contact Career & Professional Development at career@stetson.edu or 386-822-7315.

PSYC 414. Neuropsychology. 1 Unit.

This course will instruct students in clinical organic disorders affecting brain function. Diseases will include neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's Disease, clinical syndromes such as aphasia, traumatic brain injuries and strokes. Students will become familiar regarding how brain diseases manifest in behavior and how they are treated. Prerequisite: PSYC 211 and PSYC 251V. Offered at least once every two years.

PSYC 435. Childhood Behavior Disorders. 1 Unit.

In the first part of the course, the nature of normal and abnormal development, models of developmental psychopathology, assessment techniques, diagnostic systems used for children, and psychotherapy with children are discussed. The second part of the course focuses on specific childhood behavior disorders such as anxiety disorders, mood disorders, conduct disorders, attention deficit disorders, language and learning disabilities, intellectual disability, autism, childhood schizophrenia, and other disorders. Prerequisites: PSYC 231 and junior or senior standing. Offered once per year.

PSYC 444. Psychometrics. 1 Unit.

Psychometrics is the study of measurement theories and techniques employed in psychological assessment. In this course, students will learn to evaluate the properties of items and scales in terms of their validity, reliability, standardization, and ethics. Students will then apply this knowledge by developing their own scales assessing a latent psychological trait or state. Prerequisite: PSYC 306Q. Offered at least once every two years.

PSYC 445. Psychology of Women. 1 Unit.

This course considers women’s experiences from a biopsychosocial perspective and examines the psychological impact of gender socialization. It includes theoretical and empirical investigation of sex and gender similarities and differences, women’s family relationships, women in the workplace, women of color, women who identify as sexual minorities, women's mental health, and violence in the lives of women and girls. Prerequisites: PSYC 101S; Junior or Senior standing. Offered at least once every two years.

PSYC 451. Clinical and Counseling Psychology. 1 Unit.

This course provides an overview of clinical psychology and related mental health disciplines. Students learn about the historical roots of clinical psychology and explore projective and objective clinical assessment techniques, psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, and group therapies, ethical and professional issues, and some of the emerging specialty areas in clinical psychology. Prerequisite: PSYC 251V. Offered every semester.

PSYC 452V. Human Sexuality. 1 Unit.

This course focuses on Stetson's Health and Wellness Value. The course examines psychological and physiological factors related to human sexual behavior and feelings. The student will become acquainted with contemporary research findings and theory in the area and will have the opportunity to understand better the dynamics of sexual relationships and to learn to communicate more comfortably and constructively with others regarding sexual beliefs, behaviors, and feelings. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. Offered at least once per year.

PSYC 475. Seminar. 1 Unit.

Like special topics courses, seminars are designed to extend the range of the curriculum and give students an opportunity to explore special topics. The principal difference is in the format. Seminars are necessarily limited to a small size because they devote class time almost entirely to collaborative interaction among the faculty member(s) and students involved in the course. Any prerequisites will be indicated in the course schedule.

PSYC 485. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

Independent studies are intended to provide an opportunity for students with strong interest and initiative to pursue the study of topics that are not part of the regular course offerings. They are arranged by mutual agreement between faculty member and student. Before agreeing to supervise an independent study, ordinarily a faculty member will ask the student to present a clear, written proposal for the work to be completed. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

PSYC 490. Special Topics in Psychology. 1 Unit.

These lecture/discussion courses are designed to extend the range of the curriculum and give students an opportunity to explore special topics. Such topics, which may vary from semester to semester, might include, for example, particular theorists, distinctive theoretical perspectives, specific problems, or particular areas of research. Any prerequisites will be indicated in the course schedule.

PSYC 498. Research Methods and Proposal. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to deepen the student’s understanding of the scientific method as an active process. Course goals include learning to synthesize peer-reviewed literature, develop hypotheses, operationalize variables, analyze and interpret results, and report research in APA style. In addition to applying these techniques in course assignments, students will use them to develop a research proposal for their senior research project to be carried out in PSYC 499. Required course for the major. To be completed after PSYC 321Q. Prerequisites: PSYC 321Q and must have at least 20 units completed (80 credit hours).

PSYC 499. Senior Project. 1 Unit.

Students complete the research project they designed in PSYC 498, analyze their data, and prepare an APA-style manuscript and oral presentation reporting their results. Class meetings are supplemented with individual conferences with the instructor. Required course for the major. To be completed in the senior year, after PSYC 498. Prerequisite: PSYC 498.