Honors Program

Stetson's University Honors Program (UHP) graduated its first class in 1957, making it one of the oldest in the Southeast. It aims to serve accomplished students with an unusual commitment to scholarship and autonomous learning. Admission to the program is by application. Interested students should contact the Director.

The Honors Program curriculum offers students an alternative to the General Education requirements. Faculty and students identified the following priorities in designing the program’s unique curriculum:

  • The Honors curriculum calls on both students and faculty members to conceive of themselves as members of an interdisciplinary community committed to integrated ways of thinking and learning.
  • The Honors curriculum seeks to foster the kind of scholarly and creative work that, while strongly supported by faculty and staff mentors at Stetson, is ultimately independent and student-driven.
  • The Honors curriculum encourages introspection and self-discovery through the Credo Project and active participation in the scholarly and community affairs.
  • The Honors curriculum embraces the idea that education occurs inside and outside the classroom.

The Curriculum

The following degrees can be earned through the Honors Program: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Business Administration, and Bachelor of Music.

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

In these courses, Honors Program students develop skills in analytical, critical, and quantitative thinking; in written and oral communication; and in problem-solving as individuals and as members of groups and communities.

  • Writing

Writing skills are critical for success in college and in life after graduation. Students in the UHP must fulfill the writing requirement of their degree.

  • Modern Languages

These courses enhance students' knowledge of the world by developing their proficiency in another modern language and by emphasizing the role of language in culture. All students are strongly enjoined to take a Modern Language class at the 201 or higher level, which meets the minimum language course to meet Phi Beta Kappa stipulations.

  • The following 8 courses (3.5 units, plus non-credit courses) within the Honors Program:
  • HONR 101Honors First-Year Seminar “Enduring Questions” (Taken during the first semester.)1
    HONR 102Honors Project (Taken during the second semester.)0.5
    HONR 201Honors Workshop (Taken during the third semester.)0.5
    HONR 202Honors Tutorials (Taken during the fourth semester.)0.5
    HONR 301Honors Junior Seminar (Taken during the third or fourth year, preferably during the third.)1
    The following courses are taken during each semester of the fourth year
    Best Books Club
    Best Books Club
    HONR 499Honors Oral Exam and Credo Presentation (Taken during a student's final semester.)0.0
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES:

Natural World/Quantitative Reasoning (1 unit). Students in the College of Arts and Sciences must complete one course from one of these two areas:

  • Quantitative Reasoning:

Quantitative reasoning skills play an important role in analyzing the world and in choosing the best plans to address local, national, and global problems. Courses that meet this requirement develop students' understanding of the conceptual and theoretical tools used in quantitative reasoning and problem-solving. These courses are taught in a range of disciplines. Some majors, particularly in the Natural Sciences, require at least one specific math course to be taken, and that course may also be used to satisfy the Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

-or-

  • The Physical and Natural World:

Courses that satisfy the Physical and Natural World option ("P" courses) foster students' understanding of natural phenomena, through the examination of major concepts, theories, and scientific methods in the physical and life sciences. These courses include a laboratory experience that connects theory with observation.

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENTS IN THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS:

Students in the School of Business who complete a section of HON 201 that includes a business writing component are exempt from BADM 205, Professional Communication. To fulfill their general education requirements, students pursuing a Bachelor in Business Administration, in addition to the Honors Curriculum, must take each of the following courses:

  • Math (1 unit). Students must take one of the following three courses:
    • MATH 122Q Business Math II: Calculus and Optimization (recommended).
    • MATH 131Q Calculus I with Review-Part 2. (Note that MATH 130 is a prerequisite for MATH 131Q.)
    • MATH 141Q Calculus I
  • The Physical and Natural World (1 unit).

Courses that satisfy the Physical and Natural World option ("P" courses) foster students' understanding of natural phenomena, through the examination of major concepts, theories, and scientific methods in the physical and life sciences. These courses include a laboratory experience that connects theory with observation.

HONR 101. Honors First-Year Seminar “Enduring Questions”. 1 Unit.

The seminar undertakes a critical comparative study of an important and enduring question, chosen by the Honors Program students and faculty every three to five years. Texts from across disciplines (the natural sciences, the humanities, the fine arts, and the social sciences) will be used to present ideas that have had a significant impact on the present. The course includes experiential components that integrate philosophy, religion, politics, literature and art. As part of the course, students plan an Honors Project (undertaken independently in the spring semester), and begin work on Credos and proposals for the Honors Stipend. HONR 101 is taught by professors from different academic disciplines.

HONR 102. Honors Project. 0.5 Units.

Students complete the scholarly, creative, or community-service projects designed in HONR 101, and present these projects at the Stetson Undergraduate Research and Creative Arts Showcase.

HONR 201. Honors Workshop. 0.5 Units.

This course focuses on three texts: the Credo, the Honors Stipend proposal, and the group syllabus for the Honors Tutorial. Prerequisite: HONR 102.

HONR 202. Honors Tutorials. 0.5 Units.

Student-designed interdisciplinary tutorials of five to seven students, led by University faculty. Prerequisite: HONR 201.

HONR 301. Honors Junior Seminar. 1 Unit.

In their junior or senior year, students participate in a seminar focused on the question, “What does it mean to lead a life that matters?” The seminar is coordinated with the major lecture series on campus (e.g., Values Council Lecture Series and Woodrow Wilson Fellows Lectures). Students prepare for their Honors Oral Exam by substantively revising their Credo. Prerequisite: HONR 202.

HONR 395. Teaching Apprenticeship. 0.5 Units.

Pass/Fail only. By permission of the instructor. May be repeated once.

HONR 401. Best Books Club. 0.0 Units.

Modeled after Stetson’s Book Feasts, the Best Books Club meets twice a semester to discuss books chosen by the graduating Honors cohort. Required of all seniors, but open to all Honors students. A faculty member will coordinate these meetings, and when possible and appropriate, community members or visiting scholars and experts will join the discussion.

HONR 402. Best Books Club. 0.0 Units.

Modeled after Stetson’s Book Feasts, the Best Books Club meets twice a semester to discuss books chosen by the graduating Honors cohort. Required of all seniors, but open to all Honors students. A faculty member will coordinate these meetings, and when possible and appropriate, community members or visiting scholars and experts will join the discussion.

HONR 499. Honors Oral Exam and Credo Presentation. 0.0 Units.

Pass/Fail only. Required for all students during the semester immediately before graduation.