Military Science

The Army Reserve Officer’s Training Corps, or ROTC, is a program in which both female and male students from first year through senior year may participate.  The program may lead to a commission as a Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Army, U.S. Army Reserves, or the National Guard, though taking Military Science classes does not incur any military obligation unless the student receives an ROTC scholarship. We recommend these classes for anyone who would like to expand his or her leadership ability or knowledge of the military. ROTC enhances a student’s education by providing unique leadership and management training opportunities, along with practical experiences. The curriculum is designed to be exciting, educational, and flexible enough to meet scholastic and personal goals. Classes and training include map reading, land navigation, rappelling, rifle marksmanship, patrolling, tactics, drill and ceremony, military history, ethics, and military law. All uniforms, military textbooks, and equipment are issued to cadets at no charge.

Army Reserve Officer's Training

The Army Reserve Officer’s Training Corps (ROTC) program provides an opportunity to acquire skills and knowledge necessary for commissioning as a Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Army, U.S. Army Reserves, or the National Guard. The program offers both a four-year and two-year option. The two-year option allows students with at least two academic years remaining in college to meet all requirements for commissioning. The ROTC courses may be applied toward open elective requirements in degree programs.

Basic Military Science

The Basic Military Science courses are offered during the first and second years. These courses address military organization, equipment, weapons, map reading, land navigation, rank structure, threat, communications, leadership, and physical training. The courses consist of both classroom instruction and a mandatory lab and physical training.

Advanced Military Science

The Advanced Military Science courses are normally taken during the junior and senior years. These courses specialize in small unit tactics, preparation and conduct of military training, the military justice system, staff procedures, decision making and leadership, managerial concepts, problem analysis, military writing, professional ethics, and physical training. The courses consist of both classroom instruction and a mandatory lab and physical training. This phase requires attendance at the one-month long Leadership Development Assessment Course (LDAC) conducted at Fort Lewis, Washington, during the summer after the junior year.

Alternate Entry Program

For students who are about to begin their junior year and have had no prior ROTC courses, the Alternate Entry Program provides an opportunity to complete the last two years of ROTC and to be commissioned upon graduation. However, the criteria and requisites are stringent. The Professor of Military Science (PMS) is the approving authority, and the cadet must be contacted prior to enrollment.

Leader’s Training Course (LTC)

The Leader’s Training Course (LTC) is a summer training program that is offered to students who are enrolled in the Alternate Entry Course. This month-long course at Fort Knox, Kentucky, qualifies a student for entry into the Advanced Military Science Course, thus allowing completion of all requirements for commissioning within two years. Students attending this camp will receive about $800 pay.

Benefits

Two-, three-, and four-year scholarships are available to those who qualify. Academic excellence is essential to any future career, especially in today’s highly technical Army. Minimum requirements are:

  1. Hold U.S. Citizenship
  2. Be under 30 years of age the year of college graduation (waivers are possible)
  3. Meet required physical standards by passing the Army Physical Fitness Test
  4. Have a cumulative academic GPA of 2.5
  5. Have an SAT score of 920 or ACT score of 19
  6. Pass DOD Medical Evaluation Review Board physical

Scholarship benefits include up to:

  • Full tuition paid for each school year
  • Room and board paid at the discretion of the University*
  • Subsistence allowance paid at the rate of $300 per month for first-year students, $350 per month for sophomores, $450 per month for juniors, and $500 per month for seniors, up to ten months each school year
  • Books paid at the rate of $1,200 per year
  • Uniforms and other items of military equipment issued at no expense to the cadet

*In addition to the scholarship money provided by the U.S. Army, Stetson University typically provides free room and board for scholarship students, but does so at the University's discretion.

Admission to the Basic Military Science Course

The admission requirements are as follows:

  1. Enrollment in a baccalaureate program
  2. At least 17 years of age at time of entry, but not more than 30 years of age at time of graduation
  3. U.S. Citizen or naturalized citizen

Admission to the Advanced Military Science (MS) Course (All classes are taught at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, ERAU, in Daytona Beach, FL)

The admission requirements are as follows:

  1. Successful completion of the Basic Military Science Course or equivalent
  2. Successful completion of Army Physical Fitness Test
  3. Approval by the Professor of Military Science
  4. Agreement to complete the Advanced MS Course requirements and to serve on active duty or with the Army Reserve or National Guard as a Second Lieutenant
  5. Maintenance of a 2.0 overall academic GPA and a 2.5 GPA in ROTC courses

Students electing to enroll in ROTC and pursue a commission in the U.S. Army must take one of the courses listed in each of the disciplines shown below:

Written Communication Skills
ENGL 101Writing and Rhetoric1
ENGL 201Intermediate Writing1
Military History
HIST 330HWorld War II: A Global History1
HIST 360VWar and Peace in American History (Junior Seminar)1
Computer Literacy
Any computer oriented course will satisfy the requirement

All of the above are administered under the rules and regulations of the Department of the Army and are subject to periodic change.

Delvalle, Ruben
Military Science Instructor, 2014

McCulloch, Oakland
ROTC Program Director, 2011

Reyes, Kenneth
Military Science Instructor, 2014

White, Garry
Military Science Instructor, 2014

MILS 101. Basic Military Science. 0.5 Units.

A study of the defense establishment and the organization and development of the United States Army. A study of military courtesy, discipline, customs and traditions of the service. A historical perspective of the role of the different branches of the United States Army and the role they have played in the freedom of our nations. An introduction to physical readiness training and exercises that normally include M16/M4 rifle firing simulator, rappelling, and airmobile helicopter operations. Weekly leadership laboratories. If a scholarship/contracted cadet requires mandatory physical training.

MILS 102. Basic Military Science II. 0.5 Units.

A review of the customs and traditions of the service. Continued emphasis on physical training and exercises which normally include M16/M4 rifle firing simulator, rappelling, and airmobile helicopter operations. Weekly leadership laboratories. If a scholarship/ contracted cadet requires mandatory physical training.

MILS 190. Special Topics Military Science. 0.75 to 1 Units.

MILS 201. Basic Military Leadership I. 0.5 Units.

A review of the customs and traditions of the service. The fundamentals of leadership development and the importance of understanding the principles of effective leadership. The focus is on goal setting, communication, problem solving, decision making, and the group process. The course requires mandatory physical training and includes lecture and laboratory.

MILS 202. Basic Military Leadership II. 0.5 Units.

The fundamentals of military geography and their application in the use of navigational aids for military forces. A study of preventive medicine countermeasures and first aid techniques that every leader must know. Includes lecture, leadership laboratory and mandatory physical training. Two weekend training exercises normally include M16/M4 range firing simulator, rappelling, and airmobile helicopter operations.

MILS 285. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

MILS 290. Special Topics Military Science. 1 Unit.

MILS 298. US Army Airborne School. 1 Unit.

Trains students in military parachuting techniques. There are three phases of training. During the ground phase, students learn how to do parachute landing falls and practice exiting the aircraft. During the tower phase, a team effort or “mass exit” concept replaces the individual type training of the ground phase. During the jump phase, students will complete five parachute jumps, with at least one being a night operation. The jumps are conducted at 1200 ft above ground level from a fixed wing aircraft. Emphasis on physical fitness through all phases of training. This course is open only to enrolled ROTC cadets who demonstrate appropriate levels of physical fitness and emotional maturity.

MILS 301. Officership I. 1 Unit.

A course examining the foundations of officership, the character, responsibilities, and status of being a commissioned officer. Emphasis is put on the warrior ethos. The course covers a wide spectrum of subjects, from training in common military skills to fostering a value system that emphasizes service to the nation, readiness to persevere in the face of obstacles, and willingness to make personal sacrifices in pursuit of the greater good. The course includes lectures, advanced leadership laboratory, physical training, and practical field training exercises. Prerequisites: Completion of basic military science (or constructive credit) and status of a contracted Army ROTC cadet. This course is taught at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.

MILS 302. Officership II. 1 Unit.

A continuing development of the processes that distinguish commissioned military service from other professional endeavors. The main emphasis of this class is the preparation of cadets for the month long Leadership Development and Assessment Course they normally attend at the end of the junior year. Here their capability to conceptualize, innovate, synthesize information, and make sound decisions while under stress is evaluated. Includes advanced leadership laboratory, enhanced physical training, and practical field training exercises. Prerequisite: MILS 301. This course is taught at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.

MILS 385. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

MILS 390. Special Topics Military Science. 1 Unit.

MILS 401. Advanced Military Leadership. 1 Unit.

A study of military professionalism and emphasis on command and staff relationships, organizational functions and duties of various staff officers that assist in the leadership of the organization. A study of personnel and logistical systems and the role they play in helping the organization optimize operations and improve life in the Army community. Training in staff briefings is used as an introduction to military procedures. The course includes lecture, laboratory, and physical readiness training. Prerequisites: MILS 301 and MILS 302. This course is taught at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.

MILS 402. Advanced Military Leadership II. 1 Unit.

A study of ethics and professionalism in the military and the role they play in carrying out the defense policy of the United States. The fundamentals of military law, its impact on the American military society. A study of the law, its impact on the American military society, and its place in the jurisdictional process of American society. A study of the law and warfare and its relationship to the conduct of soldiers in combat. The course includes lectures, laboratory, and physical readiness training. Prerequisite: MILS 401. This course is taught at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.

MILS 485. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

MILS 490. Special Topics Military Science. 1 Unit.