Sociology, Anthropology, and Public Health

Sociology and Anthropology

Have you ever wondered why some people succeed, while others seem destined to fail? Why women and men may view the same issues so differently? Why the United States is so violent? How social and environmental problems in other societies affect us? If you find these questions intriguing, then sociology or anthropology may be the right field of study for you.

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology invites you to learn about the social world around you, from Stetson and DeLand to the farthest corners of the globe. In the process, we will challenge you to question the obvious and customary, to ponder provocative questions, to investigate social problems, and to learn how you can help make our world a better place.

The department provides opportunities for you to use familiar social settings as resources for investigating social phenomena. Topics for research, discussion, and intellectual inquiry are as varied as social life. Sociology and anthropology students benefit from small classes, close faculty-student mentorship, a challenging curriculum, and a variety of teaching approaches, including seminars, experiential and collaborative learning, community-based research, and internships. We offer courses to improve basic skills that are keys to success in any career. These skills include written and oral communication, research design and implementation, critical thinking and analysis, and statistical and computer literacy.

More information can be found online at http://www.stetson.edu/academics/programs/sociology-and-anthropology.php.

Public Health

How do we improve the health of individuals, communities, and nations?  What environmental exposures are harmful to our health?  What are our risks for certain chronic and infectious diseases?  How do we prevent diseases from spreading?  Why are there health inequalities, and how do we eliminate them?  Where do we focus local, state, national, and global funds for improving population health?  How do we change our health behaviors?   

Public Health offers solutions to these questions. The goal of public health is to protect, preserve, promote, and improve the health of communities and populations and to keep everyone safe from disease and harm on a local, national, and global scale. Public health addresses disease, as well as the social, behavioral, environmental, political, epidemiological, statistical, and biological, processes in communities that affect health. Understanding these issues depends on concepts and skills drawn from diverse liberal arts disciplines. Public health is an interdisciplinary field with the common purpose of promoting and protecting the health of a population. Public health programs focus on proactive prevention (versus reactive treatment) and address the needs of a population as a whole (rather than individuals). Public health practitioners work in concert with clinical medicine in environmental health, health promotion and protection, disease prevention and surveillance, health policy, nutrition, and health assessment and statistical modeling.

Learn more about Public Health: 

Majors in Sociology, Anthropology, and Public Health

Minors in Sociology, Anthropology, and Public Health

Certificate Program in Criminology

The four requirements for sociology majors seeking the criminology certificate include the following:
SOCI 302JCriminology1
SOCI 379Sociology of Law1
SOCI 397Internship in Sociology1
Either SOCI 247 or a sociology elective in Area 2: Social Issues and Inequality, with student emphasis on a criminology-related issue through a major course assignment, paper, project, and/or presentation (Please consult the department chairperson prior to registering for the course.)1
Total Units4

Advising Course Plans

Core, Rachel S.
Assistant Professor of Sociology, 2014
B.A., Carleton College
M.S., University of London
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University

Everett, Diane D.
Professor of Sociology, 1989
Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences, 2013
B.A., Millsaps College
M.A., Ph.D., Duke University

Flint-Hamilton, Kimberly B.
Professor and Chair of Sociology and Anthropology, 1999
B.S., University of Notre Dame
Ph.D., Duke University

Gunn, Laura H.
Associate Professor and Chair of Public Health, 2016
B.A., Jacksonville University
M.S., Ph.D., Duke University

Jackson, Sharmaine
Assistant Professor of Sociology, 2016
B.A., University of Colorado at Boulder
J.D., Rutgers School of Law
Ph.D., University of California at Irvine

Johnson, Asal M.
Assistant Professor of Public Health, 2016
B.S., Azad University
M.A., University of Tehran
M.P.H., Georgia Southern University
Ph.D., Florida State University

Smith, Sven L.
Assistant Professor of Sociology, 2014
B.A., Stetson University
M.A., University of Chicago
J.D., Florida State University
Ph.D., University of Florida

ANTH 101B. Understanding Culture: An Introduction to Anthropology. 1 Unit.

This course introduces the principles of cultural anthropology and analyzes how human groups construct and articulate meaning. It explores the various ways of thinking, feeling, subsisting, communicating, and believing. Major topics include language, economic production and consumption, sex and gender, and the creative arts as expressions of culture. Offered at least once a year. Can be used as an S course.

ANTH 190. Special Topics in Anthropology. 1 Unit.

ANTH 195. Latin I. 1 Unit.

For students who have had little or no previous Latin, these courses give students a thorough understanding of the Latin language.

ANTH 196. Latin II. 1 Unit.

For students who have had little or no previous Latin, these courses give students a thorough understanding of the Latin language. Prerequisite: ANTH 195.

ANTH 201P. Our Human Origins: Introduction to Physical Anthropology. 1 Unit.

How did human beings evolve? This course explores the basics of evolutionary theory, primate development and behavior, and the hominid fossil record. The lab includes exercises on inheritance, comparative osteology, and anthropometry.

ANTH 220A. Glory of Greece I: Greek Art and Archaeology. 1 Unit.

The cultural traditions of the Graeco-Roman world shaped virtually every aspect of European and American culture. Many elements of Greek and Roman expression have persisted into the modern world, especially artistic ideals. This course focuses on three artistic media: architecture – secular forms as expression of social hierarchy and religious forms as expression of the relationship between human and divine; pottery painting, its techniques, and the ways in which the compositions express and solidify cultural bonds; and sculpture as expression of the male and female aesthetic. This course constitutes the first part of the Glory of Greece sequence. It covers the art, archaeology, and architecture of the Neolithic, Bronze Age, Iron Age/Geometric, and Orientalizing periods, and serves as an introduction to the second half of the sequence, ANTH 221A Glory of Greece II.

ANTH 221A. Glory of Greece II: Greek Art and Archaeology. 1 Unit.

This course focuses on the artistic expression of the sixth, fifth, and fourth centuries BCE and explores the glories of the Archaic, Classical, and early Hellenistic periods.

ANTH 230A. Glory of Rome: Roman Art and Archaeology. 1 Unit.

The cultural traditions of the Graeco-Roman world shaped virtually every aspect of European and American culture. Many elements of Greek and Roman expression have persisted into the modern world, especially artistic ideals. A natural follow-up to its Glory of Greece companions, Glory of Rome also focuses on three artistic media: architecture – secular forms as expression of social hierarchy and religious forms as expression of the relationship between human and divine; pottery painting, its techniques, and how the compositions express and solidify cultural bonds; and the wall paintings of Pompeii and Herculaneum.

ANTH 285. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

This course is initiated by student interest and contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Students may take more than one ANTH 285, ANTH 385, or ANTH 485 course during their career with different titles and content.

ANTH 290. Special Topics in Anthropology. 1 Unit.

This course is initiated by student interest and contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Students may take more than one ANTH 290, ANTH 390, or ANTH 490 course during their career with different titles and content.

ANTH 301. Field Research Methods in Anthropology. 1 Unit.

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the wide variety of field research methods in anthropology, including: participant observation, network analysis, historical methods, surveys, linguistic methods, cross-cultural comparative research, visual anthropology, and others. Students will design and implement their own “mini-studies” using these techniques and gain practical experience in the field. Offered at least once every two years. Prerequisite: ANTH 101B.

ANTH 302D. From Voodoo to the Saints: African American Religions. 1 Unit.

What are the elements of African American religious traditions and how did they develop? This junior seminar examines the faith traditions of African Americans from their own perspectives, tracing the roots of African religious traditions, such as Voodoo, the shaping force slavery had on slaves and their perceptions of the divine, the ways in which African elements were incorporated into Christianity (especially Catholicism) during and immediately following the abolition of slavery, and the ways that African Americans have historically used religious institutions as windows through which freedom, social needs, and political organization and expression are visualized and articulated. Junior Seminar.

ANTH 310J. No Way Out: Pompeii and Katrina. 1 Unit.

What is a “natural” disaster? This course explores the concept of disaster by focusing on the concept that so-called natural disasters are often the result of human activities and highlight systems of social inequality. Using the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 ACE and Katrina’s effect on New Orleans in 2005, this course explores the demographic shape of disaster. Junior Seminar.

ANTH 385. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

This course is initiated by student interest and contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Students may take more than one ANTH 285, ANTH 385, or ANTH 485 course during their career with different titles and content.

ANTH 390. Special Topics in Anthropology. 1 Unit.

This course is initiated by student interest and contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Students may take more than one ANTH 290, ANTH 390, or ANTH 490 course during their career with different titles and content.

ANTH 395. Teaching Apprenticeship. 0.5 Units.

Pass/Fail only. A teaching apprenticeship provides an opportunity for a student with an especially strong interest and ability in anthropology to achieve a deeper understanding of a given subject area by working directly with a department faculty member in the design and implementation of a course. The apprenticeship is arranged by mutual agreement between the faculty member and the student. Such an experience is especially beneficial for students who are considering university teaching as a profession. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. May be repeated once within the department.

ANTH 397. Internship in Anthropology. 0.5 or 1 Units.

This course provides an opportunity for students to enrich their classroom experiences by exploring a substantive area of anthropology in an approved setting. Typically, full unit internships require approximately 140 hours for the semester. The student intern and supervising instructor negotiate the setting, structure, requirements, and outcomes and outline them in a contract signed by the student. Basic expectations include field notes; a research paper, project, or other appropriate work product; and a letter of evaluation from the site supervisor. Students may take only one ANTH 397 course for elective anthropology credit. Prerequisite: Anthropology minor status or permission of instructor.Enrollment in an internship course requires students to attend an orientation prior to beginning work at their internship site. For more information regarding internship orientations, please contact Career & Professional Development at career@stetson.edu or 386-822-7315.

ANTH 485. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

This course is initiated by student interest and contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Students may take more than one ANTH 285, ANTH 385, or ANTH 485 course during their career with different titles and content.

ANTH 490. Special Topics in Anthropology. 1 Unit.

This course is initiated by student interest and contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Students may take more than one ANTH 290, ANTH 390, or ANTH 490 course during their career with different titles and content.

PUBH 240W. Introduction to Public Health. 1 Unit.

This course discusses an interdisciplinary perspective of the health of individuals and populations locally, nationally, and globally. The roles of natural, social, and behavioral sciences, including communities, the environment, policies, and business, are discussed in relation to diverse individual and population health, including health care systems, interventions, services and delivery. Public health careers are presented, and a survey of responsibilities of global, national, state, and local organizations are also described.

PUBH 290. Special Topics. 1 Unit.

PUBH 300. Foundations of Health Policy. 1 Unit.

This course covers U.S. healthcare system organizational structures, including the Affordable Care Act. Healthcare delivery, management, and financing are introduced, comparing health systems globally, assessing their differences and the impact on social justice. Legal, ethical, and economic issues are addressed among historical and current policies and practices. Students discuss case studies and health policy current events locally, nationally, and globally. Offered once per year.

PUBH 301. Foundations of Environmental Health Science. 1 Unit.

Students assess fundamental concepts of environmental factors impacting human health, including sources, exposure pathways, and methods of prevention, intervention, and control. Water, air, and soil pollution are examined, and introductory toxicology and adverse health effects to which a diversity of populations is exposed. Students discuss case studies, current environmental health issues, and related scholarly publications, including environmental justice and policy. Offered once per year.

PUBH 303. Global Health. 1 Unit.

The course introduces students to the values, concepts, and functions of public health applied to solving global health problems. Students will learn how social, economic, political, environmental and cultural factors influence and interact with global health challenges. This course will take an interdisciplinary approach towards various health issues and disparities the global community encounters with a focus on developing countries.

PUBH 308Q. Health and Medical Statistics. 1 Unit.

Quantitative and analytical skills will be developed to analyze and interpret health and medical data collected from observational and experimental studies. Emphasis will be placed on interpretation of methods throughout published literature in public health, medicine, and the broader health sciences.

PUBH 325. Epidemiology. 1 Unit.

Epidemiology is the study of the causes and spread of diseases in populations. The methodologies utilized by epidemiologists gather evidence to determine not only the treatment and management of diseases, but also public health policy and funding for research. The principles and techniques of epidemiology incorporate statistical and mathematical constructs to determine the probability and outcomes of disease by answering the who, why, how, when, and where questions associated with a specific disease state or event. Prerequisite: IHSC 308Q, MATH 125Q, BIOL 243Q, PSYC 321Q, IHSC 308Q or other approved statistics course.

PUBH 375. Community Healthcare Seminar. 0.5 Units.

Offered in collaboration with practitioners from Florida Hospital, this course provides an academic foundation for expected subsequent one-year Health Coach Practicum I and II experiences with Florida Hospital. Topics include: challenges of delivering adequate healthcare in communities; population health; specific problems posed by diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular disease; ethical dimensions of “underinsurance;” community medicine and the law; and methods of improving compliance and measuring outcomes. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PUBH 376. Health Coach Practicum I. 0.5 Units.

This practicum is expected of students with successful completion of IHSC 375. Students are expected to complete at least two semesters of the practicum, though there may be exceptions for seniors and other circumstances. Students will implement concepts learned in IHSC 375 through the role of a Health Coach and will accompany Florida Hospital Community Care Team (FHCC) health professionals on patient home visits to more fully understand how an interdisciplinary care coordination team functions in the homes. Prerequisites: PUBH 375 and permission of nstructor.

PUBH 377. Health Coach Practicum II. 0.5 Units.

Offered in collaboration with Florida Hospital, this second practicum follows successful completion of IHSC 376 Health Coach Practicum I. Students are expected to complete at least two semesters of the practicum, though there may be exceptions for seniors and other circumstances. Prerequisite: IHSC 376 .

PUBH 390. Special Topics in Public Health. 0.5 or 1 Units.

PUBH 395. Teaching Apprenticeship. 0.5 Units.

PUBH 397. Public Health Internship. 1 Unit.

PUBH 490. Special Topics in Public Health. 1 Unit.

SOCI 101S. Understanding Society: An Introduction to Sociology. 1 Unit.

This course surveys the major theories, research methods, and recent issues and findings in sociology. Whether exploring gender, crime, the family, religion, race, social class, social movements, or other social phenomena, students will discover how and why people behave as they do, and, in so doing, learn more about themselves and the social world. By analyzing the effects of group relations on people’s behavior; how individuals, groups, social institutions, community, and culture affect each other; and the impact of social processes on our lives, students will discern the relevance of sociology to their own lives and to fostering social justice. Note: SOCI 101S is a prerequisite to all 300- and 400- level sociology courses. Offered every fall and spring semester.

SOCI 204. Contemporary Social Problems. 1 Unit.

This course focuses on the nature and the function of problems in modern society and culture. Topics covered include poverty and economic inequality, race-sex-age discrimination, media impact, changes in the family, crime, violence, and alienation from work and friends. The course ends with a look at the human condition, exploring the notion of whether we are creating a world culture. Area 2: Social Issues and Inequality course.

SOCI 215R. Population, Society, and Environment. 1 Unit.

This course analyzes population trends and phenomena in relation to their social setting and the environment; fertility, mortality, and migration as components of population change; and problems of population growth. Area 3: Social Change course.

SOCI 247. Social Deviance. 1 Unit.

This course examines human social behavior that society views negatively and labels as “deviant.” It analyzes theories of social deviance and how deviance is related to conventional values, roles, and social institutions. Further, it investigates deviance as a social construction and a political phenomenon. Among the topics that may be considered are crime, delinquency, sexual deviation, and drug dependency as specific forms of deviance. Area 2: Social Issues and Inequality course.

SOCI 255S. Sociology of Families and Intimate Relationships. 1 Unit.

What is a family? How can it both provide support, love, and intimacy, and yet provoke conflict, turmoil, and violence? How do today’s families differ from those of the past? Have hooking up, cohabitation, and gay and lesbian relationships replaced traditional marriages? What consequences do such changes have for individuals and society? We will analyze the social bases of contemporary U.S. families and intimate relationships and their organization and operation as a social institution, a primary group, and a set of roles and examine the interrelatedness among gender, race/ethnicity, social class, and sexuality as central features of these phenomena. Area 1: Social Institutions course.

SOCI 270S. Sport and Society. 1 Unit.

This course familiarizes students with the main concepts, theories, research methods, and issues in the field of the sociology of sport; analyzes the social bases of sport, including the role, culture, structure, organization, and functioning of sports in contemporary society; examines social controversies in sports; explores issues of race/ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and social (in)equality in sports; and relates sport as a social institution to other social institutions. Area 1: Social Institutions course.

SOCI 276S. Sociology of Criminal Procedure. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of criminal procedure and the ways in which it is developed by the relevant state and federal caselaw. Particular focus will center on "search and seizure" and other topics that govern the police and state executive. This understanding is then applied to the ways in which the sociologist views criminal procedure’s reflexive relationship with society. Area 2: Social Issues and Inequality course.

SOCI 285. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

This course is initiated by student interest and contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Students may take more than one SOCI 285, SOCI 385, or SOCI 485 course during their career with different titles and content.

SOCI 290. Topical Seminar. 0.5 or 1 Units.

This course is initiated by student interest and contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Students may take more than one SOCI 290, SOCI 390, or SOCI 490 course during their career with different titles and content. Note: A topical seminar may count as an Area 1, Area 2, or Area 3 course for sociology majors and minors; please consult the department chairperson prior to course registration.

SOCI 302J. Criminology. 1 Unit.

This course considers the extent and nature of crime in the United States, including theories of crime causation and the nation’s response to crime via the criminal justice system (e.g., police, courts, and corrections). Prerequisite: SOCI 101S or permission of instructor. Area 2: Social Issues and Inequality course.

SOCI 304S. Social Inequality. 1 Unit.

Everyone knows that social inequalities exist, but what are the nature and extent of inequalities in the United States and the wider world? What are the social impacts of inequalities? And why do inequalities exist? Are inequalities genetic or socially-created, inevitable or reversible? This course pursues answers to these questions, exploring social class, race, and gender inequalities locally, nationally, and globally. Prerequisite: SOCI 101S or permission of instructor. Area 2: Social Issues and Inequality course.

SOCI 307D. Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration. 1 Unit.

What is the role of race, ethnicity, and immigration in U.S. society and cultures? This junior seminar examines the social construction of race and ethnicity; race, ethnicity, nationality, and immigrant status as systems of identity, interpersonal and social relations, and social structure; beliefs, images, practices, and other social forces (e.g., historical and institutional) that create, maintain, and change race and ethnicity, patterns of racial/ethnic relations, stratifying practices, and social inequality; ideology, prejudice, stereotypes, and individual and institutional discrimination; and strategies for creating a just society. Area 2: Social Issues and Inequality course. Junior Seminar.

SOCI 312D. Gender and Society. 1 Unit.

“Suck it up; be a man!” “Act like a lady!” What do these phrases mean? How do we “do” gender? This course explores the social construction and dynamics of gender; the conditions and events that shape women’s and men’s identities, interactions, and lives; and their consequences for individuals and society. It analyzes how social worlds are structured and operate as gendered phenomena and the role of culture and social movements in reinforcing or challenging existing social arrangements. The intersection of gender, race/ethnicity, social class, and sexuality are highlighted as fundamental features influencing experiences and outcomes, particularly social inequality. Prerequisite: SOCI 101S or permission of instructor. Area 2: Social Issues and Inequality course.

SOCI 337D. Sociology of Developing Societies. 1 Unit.

This course analyzes social change, social movements, social stratification, economic dependency, and political conflict in developing countries, with special emphasis on Latin America, Africa, and the African Diaspora. Prerequisite: SOCI 101S or permission of instructor. Area 3: Social Change course.

SOCI 355. Sociology of the City. 1 Unit.

This course considers the origin and growth of cities and the metropolitan community; the nature of social relations in metropolitan areas; the spatial organization of the urban community; and community problems. Prerequisite: SOCI 101S or permission of instructor. Area 3: Social Change course.

SOCI 363J. Community-Based Research. 1 Unit.

This junior seminar focuses on the uses of social science theory, methodology, and data for policy, program, planning, and evaluation applications in the community. It is designed to facilitate faculty, student, and community collaboration to plan and conduct research to address social, environmental, and/or justice issues identified by the community. Students learn to apply the theories and methods they have mastered in the classroom to real problems in the community, and communities gain access to the rich research resources of the University. The result is a powerful learning experience for students and faculty, as well as a valuable research product for communities. Junior Seminar.

SOCI 370S. Work, Occupations, and Professions. 1 Unit.

Work occupies a dominant role in our lives: it defines and identifies us, dictates how we spend our time, and significantly impacts the quality of our lives and our places in society. With changes in the global economy, many Americans experience less job security and struggle to balance the demands of work and family. This course analyzes the social organization and meaning of work and trends in occupational and industrial structures and the labor market in contemporary U.S. society. It explores the relationships among gender, race/ethnicity, and social class and work and the causes and consequences of globalization on work. Prerequisite: SOCI 101S or permission of instructor. Area 1: Social Institutions course or Area 3: Social Change course.

SOCI 375. Medicine and Health in Society. 1 Unit.

This course examines how social structure influences the occurrence of illness and why some social groups suffer more sickness and diseases than others, the experiences of illness, different models/understandings/definitions of illness and how people decide when they are sick, how they respond and cope with the symptoms of various diseases, and how they make decisions about when and from whom to seek help, and finally, the profession of medicine, types of health care providers, and medical technologies and bioethics. In the end, students will learn to appreciate the extent to which medicine and health are social constructs. Prerequisite: SOCI 101S or permission of instructor. Area 1: Social Institutions course.

SOCI 379. Sociology of Law. 1 Unit.

This course examines law as a social phenomenon and explores the relationships among law and people, social conditions, and ideas. Students systematically analyze variations in the law, identify significant social factors that account for this variation, and explore several theoretical formulations about the relationship between them. Students gain an understanding of how to make sense out of diverse empirical findings, how to more accurately predict legal variation, and how to identify new avenues of possible research. Prerequisite: SOCI 101S or permission of instructor. Area 1: Social Institutions course.

SOCI 385. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

This course is initiated by student interest and contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Students may take more than one SOCI 285, SOCI 385, or SOCI 485 course during their career with different titles and content.

SOCI 390. Topical Seminar. 1 Unit.

This course is initiated by student interest and contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Students may take more than one SOCI 290, SOCI 390, or SOCI 490 course during their career with different titles and content. Note: A topical seminar may count as an Area 1, Area 2, or Area 3 course for sociology majors and minors; please consult the department chairperson prior to course registration.

SOCI 391J. Examining a Pandemic. 1 Unit.

This junior seminar course analyzes tuberculosis (TB), one of the most deadly infectious diseases, globally, historically, and currently, from sociological, public health, and anthropological perspectives. Topics include the social construction and social experience of illness, and social and structural factors contributing to TB's resurgence in poor and marginalized groups. Area 2: Social Issues and Inequality and Area 3: Social Change.

SOCI 395. Teaching Apprenticeship. 0.5 Units.

Pass/Fail only. A teaching apprenticeship provides an opportunity for a student with an especially strong interest and ability in sociology to achieve a deeper understanding of a given subject area by working directly with a department faculty member in the design and implementation of a course. The apprenticeship is arranged by mutual agreement between the faculty member and the student. Such an experience is especially beneficial for students who are considering university teaching as a profession. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. May be repeated once within the department.

SOCI 396. Research Apprenticeship. 0.5 or 1 Units.

A student serves as an apprentice to a faculty mentor on a project that directly supports that faculty member's research agenda. Permission of instructor. Pass/Fail or letter graded; 0.5 or 1.0 units; limited to 1.0 total units to count toward the Sociology major or minor or the Anthropology minor.

SOCI 397. Internship in Sociology. 0.5 or 1 Units.

This course provides an opportunity for students to enrich their classroom experiences by exploring a substantive area of sociology in an approved setting. Typically, full unit internships require approximately 120 hours for the semester. The student intern and supervising instructor negotiate the setting, structure, requirements, and outcomes and outline them in a contract signed by the student. Basic expectations include field notes; a research paper, project, or other appropriate work product; and a letter of evaluation from the site supervisor. Sociology majors may take up to two SOCI 397 courses during their career with different titles and contents; other students may take only one SOCI 397 course for elective sociology credit. Prerequisite: SOCI 101S, major or minor status, and permission of instructor.Enrollment in an internship course requires students to attend an orientation prior to beginning work at their internship site. For more information regarding internship orientations, please contact Career & Professional Development at career@stetson.edu or 386-822-7315.

SOCI 485. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

This course is initiated by student interest and contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Students may take more than one SOCI 285, SOCI 385, or SOCI 485 course during their career with different titles and content.

SOCI 490. Topical Seminar. 1 Unit.

This course is initiated by student interest and contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Students may take more than one SOCI 290, SOCI 390, or SOCI 490 course during their career with different titles and content. Note: A topical seminar may count as an Area 1, Area 2, or Area 3 course for sociology majors and minors; please consult the department chairperson prior to course registration.

SOCI 494. Sociology and Anthropology Colloquium. 0.0 Units.

Designed to introduce Sociology and Social Science majors and Sociology and Anthropology minors to contemporary issues in Sociology and Anthropology. Structured as a weekly seminar, participants will have opportunities to discuss current events, graduate programs, jobs/careers, personal development and professional socialization. Required for Sociology/Social Science majors (must take twice, one time during the junior or senior year) and Sociology/Anthropology minors (must take once; recommended during junior year). Prerequisite: SOCI 101S or ANTH 101B.

SOCI 495. Sociological Theories. 1 Unit.

Sociological theory enables students to think more deeply about the social world, from work and religion to sex and love to prisons, politics, and global capitalism. This course explores such subjects through the ideas of major classical and contemporary sociological theorists, including Emile Durkheim, Karl Marx, Max Weber, Michel Foucault, Pierre Bourdieu, Anthony Giddens, Jurgen Habermas, and others. Theory traditions covered include conflict theory, structural-functionalist theory, rational choice theory, symbolic interactionism, and theories of modernity and postmodernity. Offered every fall semester; should be taken in the junior year. Prerequisites: SOCI 101S and 2 other courses in sociology. Co-requisite: SOCI 496. Prerequisite to SOCI 497, SOCI 498Q, and SOCI 499.

SOCI 496. Social Research Methods. 1 Unit.

This course studies the processes of social inquiry and introduces research methods for the social sciences, with particular attention to the design and execution of quantitative and qualitative social research, including the nature, goals, and logic of social research and the structure and processes of inquiry. Topics include problem formulation; causation; the role of theory in social research; conceptualization, operationalization, and measurement; reliability and validity; sampling; quantitative and qualitative methods of data collection; coding; introduction to data analysis; and ethical and political issues of social research. Offered every fall semester; should be taken in the junior year. Prerequisites: SOCI 101S and 2 other courses in sociology. Co-requisite: SOCI 495. Prerequisite to SOCI 497, SOCI 498Q, and SOCI 499.

SOCI 497. Methods and Styles of Social Science Communication. 1 Unit.

This course emphasizes writing various types of social science documents (such as book and journal reviews, abstracts, annotated bibliographies, and the required proposal for the research thesis); communicating with lay audiences; and delivering professional presentations of scholarly work. A major component of the course is preparation of the written research proposal that serves as the basis for the senior research project in SOCI 499. Students orally present their proposals for departmental approval. Offered every spring semester; should be taken in the junior year. Prerequisites: SOCI 101S, SOCI 495, and SOCI 496. Co-requisite: SOCI 498Q. Prerequisite to SOCI 499. (This course is open to other social science majors and minors, with permission of the instructor.) Writing-intensive course.

SOCI 498Q. Tools for Quantitative Analysis. 1 Unit.

This course introduces applied statistical concepts and emphasizes the use of bivariate and multivariate statistical procedures for analyzing sample survey data. Offered every spring semester; should be taken in the junior year. Prerequisites: SOCI 101S, SOCI 495, and SOCI 496. Co-requisite: SOCI 497. Prerequisite to SOCI 499. (This course is open to other social science majors and minors, with permission of the instructor. If sociology majors fulfill this requirement through an approved statistics course in another department, another sociology course must be substituted in its place.).

SOCI 499. Senior Project. 1 Unit.

In this research course, students execute the research project they proposed in SOCI 497 and present the findings of their studies in an oral presentation and in a written report which contains an abstract; a problem statement and research objectives or hypotheses; identification of the main concepts and variables, including their definition, operationalization, and measurement; a review of the pertinent theoretical and empirical literature; a description of the study design and execution; findings and their interpretation; summary, conclusions, implications, and suggestions for further research; a bibliography; and a copy of the research instrument. Offered every fall semester; should be taken in the senior year. Prerequisites: SOCI 101S, SOCI 495, SOCI 496, SOCI 497, and SOCI 498Q. (If sociology majors fulfill this requirement through a course in another department, another sociology course must be substituted in its place.).