World Languages and Cultures

Studying a language other than English - and the culture and literature of the people who speak that language - combines personal satisfaction with career preparation. In today's globally competitive world, knowledge of a modern language greatly enhances an individual's credentials, whether in business, government, service organizations, or education. World Language graduates have pursued a variety of endeavors, including graduate study and study or work abroad. Majors can pursue concentrations in French, German, or Spanish as well as a translator’s concentration in combined languages adding Russian, Arabic, Portuguese or Chinese.

Double Major

Students usually find it possible and desirable to combine a language major with a major in another area. The Department of World Languages and Cultures favors this procedure and will advise students how best to complement their language major with their other area of study, considering such objectives as the foreign service, a business career, teaching, or graduate study. The student will have the option, with the approval of both major departments, to write a senior project in only one of his or her majors or to write two separate papers, one for each major.

Study Abroad Program

University exchange programs are available in France, Germany, Russia, Spain, and Chile. It is expected that all language majors will participate in at least one abroad experience with language exposure for either one or two semesters or one or several summers. These programs are recommended also for any student who wishes to attain a high degree of language proficiency while working on a major in another field. A large range of courses is available in the foreign centers, and the program usually facilitates the obtaining of a minor.

Application to these programs is done through WORLD: The David and Leighan Rinker Center for International Learning.

Minor

A minor is offered in French, German, Russian, or Spanish. It consists of five units above the 102L level in the chosen language. The student's adviser and a professor in the planned minor determine the sequence and combination of courses. Any appropriate courses listed in the Stetson University Catalog may be applied to the units required for the minor. A World Language minor may be fully completed during one semester abroad in a foreign language program after the student has finished 202L or met the prerequisite to participate.

There are also majors and minors in Latin American Studies, Russian Studies, and International Studies. Consult those sections of this Catalog for descriptions.

Scholarships

Consult the Office of Financial Aid concerning the Corinne Lynch Scholars Program for World Language majors and the Elrod-Berge Travel Scholarship program for students of French and Spanish.

Courses at the 102L level and above, except those taught in English, offer credit for the World Language General Education requirement (“L”).

Student learning outcomes describe what students know, understand and are able to do as a result of completing a degree program. The learning outcomes for this program are:

  1. Communication
    • Engage in conversation, provide and obtain information, express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions
    • Interpret written and spoken language on a variety of culturally appropriate topics
    • Present information, concepts, and ideas to an audience of listeners or readers on a variety of culturally appropriate topics
  2. Cultures
    • Describe and apply a basic knowledge of historical, political and aesthetic perspectives of the societies being studied and how these are reflected in the patterns of socially accepted behavior as well as in attitudes and values
    • Analyze in written and spoken form the means by which literature, film and other media of the cultures studied demonstrate alternative ways of seeing, feeling and understanding
  3. Connections
    • Demonstrate their capacity to do research in the target language and in other disciplines relevant to the topic/task at hand (including political, historical and aesthetic concepts, worldwide health issues, environmental concerns, race and gender)
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the distinctive viewpoints that are only available through the target language and its cultures

Minor in French - 5 Units

Requirements
Five Units at the FREN 201L level and above.5
Total Units5

Minor in German - 5 Units

Requirements
Five Units at the GERM 201L level and above.5
Total Units5

Minor in Russian - 5 Units

Requirements
Five Units at the RUSS 201L level and above.5
Total Units5

Minor in Spanish - 5 Units

Requirements
Five Units at the SPAN 201L level and above.5
Total Units5

Minor in World Language - 5 Units

Requirements
Five Units in a language at 201L level and above in the same language 15
Total Units5
1

One foreign language of choice.

Cappas-Toro, Pamela
Associate Professor of World Languages and Cultures, 2013
B.A., University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez
M.A., University of Texas at San Antonio
Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Clemmen, Yves-Antoine
Professor and Chair of World Languages and Cultures, 1992
Jane Heman Language Professor, 2018
Licenses de Philologie Germanique, University de l’état à Liège, Belgium
M.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Denner, Michael A.
Professor of Russian Studies, 2000
Director of the Honors Program
Director of the Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies Program
B.A., Indiana University
M.A., Ph.D., Northwestern University

Eire, Ana
Professor of World Languages and Cultures, 1990
Jane Heman Language Professor, 2010
Licenciatura, University Complutense de Madrid
M.A., Ph.D., Vanderbilt University

Ripert, Yohann
Assistant Professor of World Languages and Cultures
B.M., The Julliard School
M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D. Columbia University

Sitler, Robert K.
Professor of World Languages and Cultures, 1994
B.A., M.A., Kent State University
Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin

Zheltoukhova, Snezhana S.
Visiting Assistant Professor of World Languages and Cultures, 2017
B.A./M.A., Moscow (Lomonosov) State University, Russia
M.A., Ph.D., University of Missouri-Columbia

Chinese

CHIN 101. Elementary Mandarin Chinese I. 1 Unit.

For students who have had no previous Mandarin or who placed at that level. This course creates the foundation for the acquisition of speaking, listening, writing and reading skills in Mandarin. Cultural topics will be an integral part of the language learning. Not open to native speakers.

CHIN 102L. Elementary Mandarin Chinese II. 1 Unit.

For students who have completed CHIN 101 and for those who have had more than two years of regular high-school Mandarin whose placement scores indicate admission to this level. this course focuses on the further acquisition and development of basic Mandarin language skills and expanding the foundation for cultural competency toward the Mandarin speaking countries. Prerequisite: CHIN 101. Not open to native speakers.

French

FREN 101. Elementary French I. 1 Unit.

For students who have had no previous French or no more than two years of regular high-school French. Not available to native speakers.

FREN 102L. Elementary French II. 1 Unit.

For students who have completed FREN 101 and for students who have had more than two years of regular high-school French whose placement scores indicate admission to this level. Not available to native speakers.

FREN 185. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

FREN 190. Special Topics in French. 1 or 1.25 Unit.

FREN 201L. Intermediate French I. 1 Unit.

Provides students the opportunity to strengthen and expand basic language skills as well as their cultural awareness of the diversity of the francophone world. Prerequisite: FREN 102L, appropriate placement scores, or permission of instructor. Not available to native speakers.

FREN 202L. Intermediate French II. 1 Unit.

A continuation of the structure and goals of FREN 201L with an added emphasis on developing more complex reading skills. Prerequisite: FREN 201L, appropriate placement scores, or permission of instructor. Not available to native speakers.

FREN 285. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

FREN 290. Special Topics in French. 1 Unit.

FREN 301L. Advanced French. 1 Unit.

Emphasis on developing and practicing advanced language skills necessary for upper division courses. The focus will be on extensive vocabulary building, syntax and stylistics through culturally enriching material from a wide variety of media. Prerequisite: FREN 202L, appropriate placement scores, or permission of the instructor. Repeatable with permission of instructor.

FREN 302L. Advanced French II. 1 Unit.

Same emphasis as FREN 301L (these do not have to be taken in sequence). Prerequisite: FREN 202L, appropriate placement scores, or permission of the instructor.

FREN 303L. Business French and Culture. 1 Unit.

Emphasis upon the vocabulary and writing skills necessary for the business world. Prerequisite: FREN 201L.

FREN 304A. Contemporary French Cinema. 1 Unit.

An examination of contemporary French cinema within an interdisciplinary context. The course provides students with the opportunity to grow familiar with French cinema while at the same time studying French history, literature, and politics as part of its discourse. Open to all students. Taught in English. Course can be repeated with different content. Course can only count once toward major or minor.

FREN 305B. Franco-American Cultural Studies. 1 Unit.

Course taught in English and open to all students. This course will primarily focus on the relationships between France and the United States. It will encourage students to investigate the political, social, and cultural interactions between these two nations in the course of history. Although the concentration will be on Franco-American connections, the course will foster a broader awareness and understanding of cultural differences necessary in today's increasingly global society.

FREN 306L. French Culture Thru Literature. 1 Unit.

This course explores different cultural topics, constructions, and themes through the prism of the literatures of the French and Francophone world. It will rely mainly on primary sources in the target language. Readings, discussions and assignments will be in French. The content of this class may change from one instructor to another. Prerequisite: FREN 202L or permission of instructor.

FREN 308V. Mediterranean Memories: Muslims, Jews and Christians Before and After Colonialism. 1 Unit.

This course focuses on Stetson's Social Justice Value. In this class, we will attempt to understand the context of inter-communal relations under the French flag in North Africa and the Middle East as well as why they came undone. Junior Seminar.

FREN 309V. Revolution in the Age of Globalization. 1 Unit.

This course focuses on Stetson's Social Justice Value. The course will explore the history of the concept from the French and American Revolutions to the Civil Rights Movement and the Arab Spring, and assess its future in an age of digitalism, globalism, and worldwide activism. Have recent global trends rendered revolutions obsolete, or will they persist as a means of socio-political transformation? Readings from Rousseau, Marx, Lenin, Luxemburg, Fanon, Huntington. Junior Seminar.

FREN 330V. Forbidden Texts: Censorship, Free Speech, and the Control of the Imagination. 1 Unit.

This course focuses on Stetson's Social Justice Value. This course investigates how governments, religious bodies, and other institutions have used censorship to control their constituents’ freedom and imagination: from Montaigne’s Essays to Charlie Hebdo’s Muhammad Cartoons. What can the censorship of a book, film, or document tell us about our society? Reading primary and secondary sources, we engage in critical discussions on an issue we confront in our daily lives: free speech. Junior Seminar.

FREN 385. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

FREN 385L. Independent Study. 1 Unit.

FREN 390. Special Topics in French. 1 Unit.

FREN 395. Teaching Apprenticeship. 0.5 Units.

Pass/Fail only. A teaching apprenticeship gives a student insight into the methodological aspects of teaching a class in Modern Languages. It consists in class observations, goals and strategies discussions with the instructor, and some teaching responsibilities in and out of the classroom. The apprenticeship is arranged by mutual agreement between the faculty member and the student. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. May be repeated once.

FREN 397. Internship in French. 0.5 or 1 Units.

A student–initiated internship where skills in French can be developed. Prerequisites: completion of FREN 201L and permission of instructor and chair. Pass/Fail only. Enrollment in an internship course requires students to attend an orientation prior to beginning work at their internship site. For more information regarding internship orientations, please contact Career & Professional Development at career@stetson.edu or 386-822-7315.

FREN 401L. Topics in Literature. 1 Unit.

Various courses are offered under these titles addressing different periods, genres or themes in the history of French literature. Prerequisite: FREN 301L or FREN 302L.

FREN 402L. Topics in Literature. 1 Unit.

Various courses are offered under these titles addressing different periods, genres or themes in the history of French literature. Prerequisite: FREN 301L or FREN 302L.

FREN 403A. Reading Photography - French Photography in Practice and Theory. 1 Unit.

This class will offer a multi-facetted approach to French photography as artistic and/or cultural practice and study the creation of a discourse on photography. Prerequisite: FREN 301L or FREN 302L. Can be used as an L course.

FREN 404L. Topics in Media Culture. 1 Unit.

Various courses are offered under these titles addressing different aspects of French visual media culture like photography, cinema, visual narratives in a historical and critical perspective. Prerequisite: FREN 301L or FREN 302L.

FREN 405L. Topics in French and Francophone Cultural Studies. 1 Unit.

Various courses are offered under this title emphasizing aspects of French culture from a historical perspective. Literary and other cultural documents as well as examples in the visual arts and in music will introduce students to diverse aspects of the French and Francophone world. Prerequisite: FREN 301L or FREN 302L.

FREN 406L. Topics in French and Francophone Cultural Studies. 1 Unit.

Various courses are offered under this title emphasizing aspects of French culture from a historical perspective. Literary and other cultural documents as well as examples in the visual arts and in music will introduce students to diverse aspects of the French and Francophone world. Prerequisite: FREN 301L or FREN 302L.

FREN 407L. French Linguistics. 1 Unit.

This course will introduce students to the scientific study of the French language and refine their understanding of the workings of language in general. Prerequisite: FREN 301L or FREN 302L.

FREN 485. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

FREN 485L. Independent Study. 1 Unit.

FREN 490. Special Topics in French. 1 Unit.

FREN 499. Senior Project. 1 Unit.

Research project in French or Francophone literature or culture developed in conjunction with advisor.

 German

GERM 101. Elementary German I. 1 Unit.

For students who have had no previous German or whose examination scores indicate 101 placement. This course creates the foundation for the acquisition of speaking, listening, writing and reading skills in German. Cultural topics will be an integral part of the language learning. Offered every fall semester. Not available to native speakers.

GERM 102L. Beginning German II. 1 Unit.

For students who have completed GERM 101 or whose examination scores indicate 102 placement. As a continuation of GERM 101, this course focuses on the further acquisition and development of basic German language skills and expanding the foundation for cultural competency toward the German speaking countries. Offered every spring semester. Not available to native speakers.

GERM 190. Special Topics in German Language and Literature. 1 Unit.

GERM 201L. Intermediate German I. 1 Unit.

Provides students the opportunity to strengthen and expand basic language skills for more diversified and complex communicative purposes. This course will focus on expanding students’ active vocabulary and on strengthening skills in grammatically correct oral and written discourse. Prerequisite: GERM 102L or appropriate placement score or permission of instructor. Offered every fall semester. Not available to native speakers.

GERM 202L. Intermediate German II. 1 Unit.

A continuation of the structure and goals of GERM 201L. A focus will be on expanded language acquisition through active engagement with texts from a wide spectrum of media. Prerequisite: GERM 201L, appropriate placement score, or permission of instructor. Offered every spring semester. Not available to native speakers.

GERM 203B. Transcultural Migrations: Africa in Western Cultures. 1 Unit.

GERM 285. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

GERM 290. Special Topics in German Language and Literature. 1 Unit.

GERM 301L. Advanced German I. 1 Unit.

Emphasis on developing an advanced level of proficiency especially in writing and conversation skills. This course will focus on the appropriate use of idiomatic German, as well as on variations in syntax and style. Prerequisite: GERM 202L or permission of instructor.

GERM 302L. Advanced German II. 1 Unit.

A continuation of the structure and goals of GERM 301 with a strong emphasis on issues in modern German culture. Students will engage in analysis of different cultural phenomena and practices in German speaking countries. Prerequisite: GERM 301L or permission of instructor.

GERM 304B. Modern German Culture (in English). 1 Unit.

Taught in English. Open to all students. This course will emphasize aspects of German culture from a historical perspective. Literary and other cultural documents as well as examples in the visual arts and in music will introduce students to diverse aspects of modern Germany as it developed into a multicultural nation. Writing enhanced course.

GERM 305A. Contemporary German Cinema. 1 Unit.

An examination of contemporary German cinema within an interdisciplinary context. The course provides students with the opportunity to grow familiar with German cinema while simultaneously studying German history, literature, and politics as part of its discourse. In English. Can be repeated for different course content. Course can only count once toward major or minor.

GERM 306B. From Division to Reunification. The New Germany. 1 Unit.

The course outlines the post-war social and cultural developments of the two Germanys until re-unification and addresses questions related to a re-orientation in cultural practices and products (film, literature, art and architecture) in the New Germany. The course will include excursions to Berlin, Weimar and other sites of interest as they relate to the course content. In English.

GERM 307V. Migrations: The Culture of Border Crossings. 1 Unit.

This course focuses on Stetson's Human Diversity Value. Focus on migration to German-speaking countries. Using film, literature and other cultural documents, the course explores border crossings and migrations as concepts and movements that question dominant definitions of political, social, and cultural demarcations and asks questions about the possibilities of creating different personal and collective identities and affiliations that grow out of living in a social and cultural diaspora. Junior Seminar.

GERM 385. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

GERM 390. Special Topics in German Language and Literature. 1 Unit.

The goal of this course will be to attain fluency of the German language at the idiomatic and stylistic level and to acquire the language strategies for understanding and utilizing nuanced constructions. The specific topic of this course will vary, but it will always have a cultural emphasis (Germans and the environment, Germany as a multicultural nation, an historical event or period). The topic will be examined utilizing a variety of texts (literature, poetry, biography) and media sources (print, television, film). Prerequisite: GERM 302L.

GERM 395. Teaching Apprenticeship. 0.5 Units.

Pass/Fail only. A teaching apprenticeship gives a student insight into the methodological aspects of teaching a class in Modern Languages. It consists in class observations, goals and strategies discussions with the instructor, and some teaching responsibilities in and out of the classroom. The apprenticeship is arranged by mutual agreement between the faculty member and the student. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. May be repeated once.

GERM 397. Internship in German. 0.5 or 1 Units.

A student-initiated internship where skills in German can be developed. Prerequisites: completion of GERM 201L and permission of instructor and chair. Enrollment in an internship course requires students to attend an orientation prior to beginning work at their internship site. For more information regarding internship orientations, please contact Career & Professional Development at career@stetson.edu or 386-822-7315.

GERM 402L. Studies in German Literature. 1 Unit.

This course is organized around a specific theme or literary period, a genre or a selected author or group of authors in German speaking countries. It is designed to strengthen and expand students’ skills in critical analysis of literary texts.

GERM 404. Voices from the East and West: German Women Writers. 1 Unit.

The course focuses on a comparative analysis of women’s literature in East and West Germany. It addresses questions related to diverse narrative perspectives and themes and relates these differences to women’s experiences within the radically different socio-political and cultural realities of East and West Germany. It will also examine changes and continuities after German re-unification. Taught in English.

GERM 485. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

GERM 490. Special Topics in German Language and Literature. 1 Unit.

GERM 499. Senior Project. 1 Unit.

Italian

ITAL 101. Elementary Italian. 1 Unit.

For students who have had no previous Italian or no more than two years of regular high school Italian. Preference given to Music students. This course will NOT satisfy the Modern Language requirement. Not available to native speakers.

ITAL 190. Special Topics in Italian Language. 1 Unit.

ITAL 290. Special Topics in Italian Language. 1 Unit.

ITAL 390. Special Topics in Italian Language. 1 Unit.

ITAL 490. Special Topics in Italian Language. 1 Unit.

Linguistics

LING 190. Special Topics in Linguistics. 1 Unit.

LING 215S. Introduction to Psycholinguistics. 1 Unit.

This course aims to develop a basic understanding of how individuals process one or more languages in the mind. It intends to explore biological and developmental concepts of language. This course will start by examining language development among children as well as adults. It will focus on processes humans engage when comprehending and producing different types of languages. In the case of bilingualism or multilingualism, this course will also explore how bilinguals and multilingual speakers are able to manage and control more than one language in the mind. The processes of early and late bilingualism will also be introduced. How is it possible that fluent bilingual/multilingual speakers are able to activate one single language and suppress another rather effortlessly? What kind of cognitive functions are responsible for language control? What kind of mental processes are responsible for word recognition and/or production? Are the processes involving word recognition the same in first and second language? This course will introduce various psycholinguistic models of language processing such as the Bilingual Interactive Activation Model of Word Recognition(BIA+) and Levelt's Model of Speech Production. In this class the nature of human language will also be explored in comparison to animal utterances and how it can or cannot be considered a type of language.The cognitive consequences of language development and bilingualism will also be presented.

LING 290. Special Topics in Linguistics. 1 Unit.

LING 301. Introduction to Linguistics. 1 Unit.

Required for teaching certification. Introduction to the scientific study of languages. Overview of the various fields of linguistics with readings and discussions of the most important current trends in this discipline. Prerequisite: Open to all students who have satisfied the University language requirement.

LING 390. Special Topics in Linguistics. 1 Unit.

LING 490. Special Topics in Linguistics. 1 Unit.

Portuguese

PORT 101. Elementary Portuguese & Lusophone Cultures I. 1 Unit.

This introductory course provides students the opportunity to develop their speaking, listening, writing and reading skills in Portuguese. We will examine a variety of cultural and historical topics including capoeira, quilombos, music, Candomble', and food as an introduction to the cultures and histories of Lusophone countries, while learning the Portuguese language. For students who have no previous Portuguese or no more than two years of regular high-school Portuguese or similar experience. Offered once a year. Not available to native speakers.

PORT 102L. Elementary Portuguese and Lusophone Cultures II. 1 Unit.

The course provides students the opportunity to keep developing their speaking, listening, writing and reading skills in Portuguese. We will keep examining a variety of cultural and historical topics from the Lusophone world, while learning the Portuguese language. For students who have no previous Portuguese or no more than two years of regular high-school Portuguese or similar experience. Prerequisite: PORT 101. Not available to native speakers.

PORT 203L. Portuguese Language and Brazilian Cultures. 1 Unit.

Not available to native speakers.This accelerated course provides students the opportunity to acquire speaking, listening, writing and reading skills in Portuguese. We will examine a variety of contemporary and historical topics including—capoeira, quilombos, samba, soccer, Candomblé, favelas, dictatorship, the Amazons, and food—as an introduction to the cultures and histories of Brazil, while learning the Portuguese language. Prerequisite: Prerequisite: SPAN 202L or equivalent proficiency; and/or or Portuguese heritage speakers. Not open to native speakers of Portuguese.

PORT 204. Portuguese Language and Brazilian Cultures II. 1 Unit.

This accelerated course provides students the opportunity to develop their speaking, listening, writing and reading skills in Portuguese. We will continue examining a variety of topics including—capoeira, quilombos, samba, soccer, Candomblé, favelas, dictatorship, the Amazons, and food—as an introduction to the cultures and histories of Brazil, while learning the Portuguese language. Prerequisites: PORT 203L; SPAN at 300 level or above, equivalent proficiency, or permission of instructor; and/or Portuguese heritage speakers. Not open to native speakers of Portuguese.

PORT 395. Teaching Apprenticeship. 0.5 Units.

Spanish

SPAN 101. Elementary Spanish I. 1 Unit.

For students who have no previous Spanish or no more than two years of regular high-school Spanish. Not open to native speakers.

SPAN 102L. Elementary Spanish II. 1 Unit.

For students who have completed SPAN 101 and for those who have had more than two years of regular high-school Spanish whose placement scores indicate admission to this level. Not open to native speakers.

SPAN 190. Special Topics. 0.5 or 1 Units.

For students who have completed SPAN 101 and for those who have had more than two years of regular high-school Spanish whose placement scores indicate admission to this level. Not open to native speakers. Not open to native speakers.

SPAN 201. Language in Cultural Contexts. 1 Unit.

SPAN 201L. Language in Cultural Contexts. 1 Unit.

Emphasis on the development of speaking and writing skills in a cultural context combined with grammar review. Prerequisite: SPAN 102L or placement by examination. Not open to native speakers.

SPAN 202L. Reading Culture (Poetry, Narrative, Drama). 1 Unit.

Emphasis on vocabulary building and the acquisition of reading skills in cultural contexts. Prerequisite: SPAN 201L, placement examination, or permission of instructor. Not open to native speakers.

SPAN 285. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

SPAN 290. Special Topics. 1 Unit.

SPAN 301L. Expression Through Writing. 1 Unit.

Emphasis on developing a high level of proficiency in the writing skills. Prerequisite: SPAN 202L or placement by examination. Writing Enhanced course.

SPAN 302L. Oral Expression. 1 Unit.

Emphasis on developing a high level of proficiency in the spoken language. Prerequisite: SPAN 202L. Not open to native speakers.

SPAN 303L. Business in Hispanic Cultures. 1 Unit.

Emphasis upon the vocabulary, concepts, and writing skills necessary for the business world in Hispanic cultures. Prerequisite: SPAN 202L.

SPAN 304L. Spanish Grammar. 1 Unit.

SPAN 305L. Understanding Spain. 1 Unit.

An introduction to the history and culture of Spain from prehistoric times to the present, including political and intellectual history, geography and the arts. Class is taught in Spanish, with readings in Spanish and English complemented by the use of audio-visual materials. Prerequisite: SPAN 202L.

SPAN 306B. Understanding Spanish America. 1 Unit.

An introduction to the history and culture of Spanish America from Pre-Columbian times to the present, including political and intellectual history, geography, and the arts. Class is taught in Spanish, with readings in Spanish and English complemented by the use of films and audio-visual materials.

SPAN 309L. Studies in Hispanic Culture. 1 Unit.

Various special topics pertaining to the culture of the Spanish speaking world are offered under this title. Class is taught in Spanish, with readings and/or complementary audio-visual materials in English and Spanish. This course may be taken more than once if the topic is different.

SPAN 310L. Spanish Cultures Through Literature. 1 Unit.

Representative Spanish literary works from the Middle Ages to the present are studied in this course. The course stresses the ways in which writers present and represent themselves as individuals and communities within changing cultural contexts. Readings and discussions are in Spanish.

SPAN 311L. Spanish-American Cultures Through Literature. 1 Unit.

Students will study important works and authors of the Spanish-speaking nations of the Western Hemisphere from the period of the conquest to the present day. Emphasis is on the ways in which writers present and represent themselves as individuals and communities within changing cultural contexts. Readings and discussions are in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 202L.

SPAN 313L. Spanish in Communities: Latinos in the U.S.. 1 Unit.

Students will complete 35 hours of service-learning through different community sites while learning about diverse social issues and concerns of Latinos in the United States. Topics explored include: education, bilingualism, health issues, the distinct causes of Latino migration, the persistence of poverty, hardships caused by citizenship status, policing, incarceration, and racial and generational differences within and between Latina/o communities. Prerequisite: SPAN 202L or permission of instructor.

SPAN 331V. Social, Political and Economic Issues in Spain and the Hispanic World. 1 Unit.

This course focuses on Stetson's Social Justice Value. This course will examine a variety of issues, such as government repression, terrorism, racism, immigration, homelessness, marginalization, and the effects of globalization, within Spain and the Spanish-speaking world.. Junior Seminar.

SPAN 385. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

SPAN 390. Special Topics. 1 Unit.

Prerequisite: SPAN 202L or placement at the 300-level or permission of instructor.

SPAN 395. Teaching Apprenticeship. 0.5 Units.

Pass/Fail only. A teaching apprenticeship gives a student insight into the methodological aspects of teaching a class in Modern Languages. It consists in class observations, goals and strategies discussions with the instructor, and some teaching responsibilities in and out of the classroom. The apprenticeship is arranged by mutual agreement between the faculty member and the student. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. May be repeated once.

SPAN 397. Internship in Spanish. 0.5 to 1 Units.

A student-initiated internship where skills in Spanish can be developed. Pre-requisites: SPAN 201L and permission of instructor and chair. Enrollment in an internship course requires students to attend an orientation prior to beginning work at their internship site. For more information regarding internship orientations, please contact Career & Professional Development at career@stetson.edu or 386-822-7315.

SPAN 414L. Theme Study. 1 Unit.

Various courses in the literature and/or cinema of Spain and/or Spanish America are offered under this title. Each course is centered on a specific theme, such as Justice, Violence, War, The Encounter, Poetic Friendships Between Spain and Spanish America, The Kitchen, Dictatorship, Exile, etc. Readings and discussions are in Spanish. This course may be repeated as an elective if content is different.

SPAN 415L. Spanish American Genre/Period Study. 1 Unit.

Various courses in the literature of Spanish America are offered under this title. Offerings include the Twentieth Century Spanish American Novel, The Contemporary Spanish American Short Story, The Argentine Novel, Spanish American Modernist Poetry, etc. This course may be repeated as an elective if content is different.

SPAN 416L. Spanish Genre/Period Study. 1 Unit.

Various courses in the literature of Spain are offered under this title, such as Golden Age Drama, Nineteenth or Twentieth Century Novel, Post-Civil War Narrative, Contemporary Theater, Spanish Crime Fiction, etc. This course may be repeated as an elective if content is different. Prerequisite: SPAN 202L.

SPAN 485. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

SPAN 490. Special Topics. 0.5 to 1 Units.

SPAN 499. Senior Research. 1 Unit.

World Languages and Cultures

WLGC 301B. Approaches to World Cultural Studies. 1 Unit.

The course introduces students to the basic principles and methods of Cultural Studies. Focusing on cultural material (literature, film, visual arts, music etc.) of Western and Non-Western nations, the course stresses a critical reflection on diverse cultural experiences, behaviors and norms and seeks to establish relationships amongst these norms and values within a global context.

WLGC 331V. Social, Political and Economic Issues in Spain and the Hispanic World. 1 Unit.

This course focuses on Stetson's Social Justice Value. This course will examine a variety of issues, such as government repression, terrorism, racism, immigration, homelessness, marginalization, and the effects of globalization, within Spain and the Spanish-speaking world.. Junior Seminar.

WLGC 397. Internship in World Lang/Cult. 0.5 or 1 Units.

Through placement in an approved setting where journalism is practiced, students will have an opportunity to enrich their classroom knowledge with field experience. Full-unit internships require 140 hours for the semester; half-unit internships require 70 hours for the semester. Specific requirements will be presented by way of a contract signed by the student. Basic expectations include a journal, a portfolio of work (if applicable), and a letter of evaluation from the site supervisor. Pre-requisites: permission of program coordinator, junior standing, and completion of both JOUR 100 and one Ideas course. May be repeated for credit up to 2 units, but a maximum of one unit may be applied to the minor. Enrollment in an internship course requires students to attend an orientation prior to beginning work at their internship site. For more information regarding internship orientations, please contact Career & Professional Development at career@stetson.edu or 386-822-7315.

WLGC 499. Senior Research in Translation. 1 Unit.

Annotated translation senior project: Substantial translation of an original untranslated text, with translator’s note on translingual and transcultural difficulties, and cultural background research on the topic. Prerequisite: Minimum of two 300-level L designated courses.