Art

Minor in Studio Art - 5 units

Minor Requirements
ARTS 101ADrawing I1
ARTS 103APainting I1
or ARTS 102A Sculpture I
Three additional ARTS units3
Total Units5

Minor in Art History - 5 units

ARTH 241AArt History Survey I: From Prehistory to 14th Century (Can be used as an H course)1
ARTH 242AArt History Survey II: From Renaissance to Contemporary (Can be used as an H course)1
Three additional ARTH units3
Total Units5

Schmitt, Julia
Professor of Theatre Arts, 2004
Chair of Creative Arts Department, 2019
B.A., Stetson University
M.A., Ph.D., Bowling Green State University

Kudryavtseva, Ekaterina
Associate Professor of Art History, 2011
Associate Chair of Creative Arts Department, 2021

B.A., Russian State University for the Humanities, Moscow, Russia
M.A., University of Oklahoma
Ph.D., University of Southern California

Molnar, Luca
Assistant Professor of Art, 2019
B.A., Dartmouth College
M.F.A., New York University

Witek, Joseph P.
Professor of Creative Arts, 1989
B.A., Franklin and Marshall College
M.A., Ph.D., Vanderbilt University

 

Art History

ARTH 190. Special Topics in Art History. 1 Unit.

These lecture/discussion courses are designed to extend the range of the curriculum and give students an opportunity to explore special topics. Their topics are contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Any prerequisites will be indicated in the course schedule. Students may take more than one ARTH 190, ARTH 290, ARTH 390, or ARTH 490 course during their career with different titles and content.

ARTH 210A. American Art. 1 Unit.

A survey of art in America from colonial times to the present. Emphasis is on the history of painting, with reference to its place in historical and cultural contexts. Also offered as AMST 210H.

ARTH 211A. Approaches to the Arts. 1 Unit.

Examines a range of works in different forms of creative expression, focusing on basic methods of analysis for studying art forms and their social and cultural contexts. Writing enhanced course.

ARTH 212A. Topics in Global Art History. 1 Unit.

The course focuses on globally dispersed and culturally diverse artistic traditions of Asia, Africa, Oceania, Islam, the pre-Columbian (pre-Conquest) Americas, and Latin America. The course offers a global perspective, through which students learn to understand and appreciate the richness of artistic expression of different cultures.

ARTH 241A. Art History Survey I: From Prehistory to 14th Century. 1 Unit.

This course introduces the students to the history of art in the Western World from prehistory to the fourteenth century. Can be used as an H course. Offered in the fall semester.

ARTH 242A. Art History Survey II: From Renaissance to Contemporary. 1 Unit.

This course introduces the students to the history of art in the Western World from the fifteen century to the present. Can be used as an H course. Offered in the spring semester.

ARTH 251A. Introduction to Comics Studies. 1 Unit.

This course introduces students to the discipline of comics studies by examining the formal characteristics and the historical development of comic strips, comic books, graphic novels and other related visual/verbal forms in a variety of national/cultural contexts.

ARTH 285. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

ARTH 290. Special Topics in Art History. 1 Unit.

These lecture/discussion courses are designed to extend the range of the curriculum and give students an opportunity to explore special topics. Their topics are contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Any prerequisites will be indicated in the course schedule. Students may take more than one ARTH 190, ARTH 290, ARTH 390, or ARTH 490 course during their career with different titles and content.

ARTH 290A. Special Topics. 1 Unit.

ARTH 310. Topics in American Art. 1 Unit.

A specialized study of selected areas in the history of American art. The course may be repeated with different content (e.g., Nineteenth Century American Landscape, Modernism in American Art). Also offered as AMST 310.

ARTH 314A. The Art and Theory of Modernism. 1 Unit.

A study of major artistic movements of the first half of the twentieth century and of the relationship between works of art and contemporary art theory and criticism. Can be used as an H course. Offered every other year in the fall semester.

ARTH 315A. Period Study in Art History. 1 to 1.25 Unit.

This course will concentrate on the art of a particular period. The course may be repeated with different content (e.g., Italian Renaissance Art, Impressionism and Post-Impressionism, Medieval Art). Can be used as an H course.

ARTH 316. Issues in Contemporary Art. 1 Unit.

This course will explore some of the chief issues and ideas which have engaged the art world in the last half of the twentieth century and the beginning of the twenty-first. Offered every other year in the spring semester.

ARTH 321V. Art Trials:Ethics,Aesth,Justic. 1 Unit.

This course focuses on Ethical or Spiritual Inquiry Value. Focusing on the relationship between law, ethics, and aesthetics, the course considers the issues of censorship and freedom of expression, cultural heritage and movement of antiquities, and artist's rights (moral rights, resale rights, and copyright) and their impact on the society at large. Junior Seminar.

ARTH 322V. Transgressive Art. 1 Unit.

This course focuses on Stetson's Ethical and Spiritual Inquiry Value. Contemporary art has often caused controversy for its violation of conventional moral beliefs. This course focuses on controversial contemporary artworks that remain shocking, disturbing, and problematic, subjecting them to ethical and aesthetic exploration. Junior Seminar.

ARTH 325S. Art Market and Institutions. 1 Unit.

This course focuses on the relations between artistic production and its market conditions. It will expose students to the commercial aspect of art and its institutions, enabling them to understand their structure, mechanisms, and function.

ARTH 334V. Curating Visual Culture. 1 Unit.

This course focuses on Stetson's Ethical and Spiritual Inquiry Value. Focusing on a variety of curatorial practices in relation to representations of visual culture, the course is designed to combine theory of curating with hands-on experience in curating a project under the professor?s guidance. The students will be introduced to critical vocabulary and theoretical framework enabling them to understand the ways in which visual culture is mapped through exhibition practices. The students will learn first-hand how to curate an exhibition, from articulating its concept to more practical issues, such as selecting the works, writings wall texts, installation, and promotion. Junior Seminar.

ARTH 341V. Comics of Disaster. 1 Unit.

This course focuses on Stetson's Ethical and Spiritual Inquiry Value. This course will examine the representation of war, personal injury and natural disaster and their physical, psychological, and political consequences in a variety of graphic narratives, focusing on the ways that artistic choices are themselves political, ideological, and ethical actions. Junior Seminar.

ARTH 344V. Art and Gender. 1 Unit.

This course focuses on Stetson's Human Diversity Value. The course focuses on influences upon the ways Western cultures have defined art and artists in gendered terms. It investigates the relevance of gender and its intersection with other categories of social identities in the creation and appreciation of art, past and present and address issues concerning art?s relation to socio-political movements and art as a form of social activism. Junior Seminar.

ARTH 365. Collection Management. 1 Unit.

An overview of the principles of collections management and their role within the broader field of museum studies. Topics include the ethics of collecting and acquiring material, conservation, registration administration, development of policy and procedure. Material will be presented through lectures, hands-on practice, guest lectures and field trips. Offered every other year in the spring semester.

ARTH 366. Museology. 1 Unit.

Museology, or museum studies, is the study of museums, museum curation, and how museums developed into their institutional role in education through social and political forces. This course provides a broad introduction to the history of museums and to debates of the philosophical nature of museums. The course identifies the various types of museums (art, history, natural history, science, etc.) and definitions. It traces the history of museums, discusses contemporary practice and examines current issues in the profession. We will also investigate the various jobs and responsibilities that people have within museums as they work on exhibitions, education, research, collection management, and conservation. Students will gain an understanding of the museum as institution, and an understanding of the challenges and responsibilities that museums and their staff members encounter.

ARTH 372V. Arts and Revolution: Visual Arts. 1 Unit.

This course focuses on Stetson's Social Justice Value. Can art change the world? This course traces how artists attempted to change society through visual arts over the threshold of the 1917 Russian Revolution, when political convulsions opened new possibilities for art and artists. We explore the possibilities of art as tool for social justice both in text and practice, focusing on Russia and Eastern Europe. Junior Seminar.

ARTH 380. Studies Art History Topics. 1 Unit.

ARTH 385. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

Study on a specialized project under the guidance of a professor.

ARTH 390. Special Topics in Art History. 1 Unit.

These lecture/discussion courses are designed to extend the range of the curriculum and give students an opportunity to explore special topics. Their topics are contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Any prerequisites will be indicated in the course schedule. Students may take more than one ARTH 190, ARTH 290, ARTH 390, or ARTH 490 course during their career with different titles and content.

ARTH 395. Teaching Apprenticeship. 0.5 Units.

Pass/Fail only. Students assist a faculty member with the teaching and management responsibilities related to one of the program?s existing courses. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. May be repeated once.

ARTH 415. Seminar in Art History. 1 Unit.

This course will concentrate on a special problem in art history and is designed to help students develop research skills and explore different methodologies in art history. The course may be repeated with different content (e.g., Women and Art, Approaches to French Impressionism).

ARTH 485. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

Study on a specialist project under the guidance of a professor. With permission of a faculty member.

ARTH 490. Special Topics in Art History. 1 Unit.

These lecture/discussion courses are designed to extend the range of the curriculum and give students an opportunity to explore special topics. Their topics are contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Any prerequisites will be indicated in the course schedule. Students may take more than one ARTH 190, ARTH 290, ARTH 390, or ARTH 490 course during their career with different titles and content.

ARTH 499. Senior Project. 1 Unit.

Art

ARTS 100A. Visual Concepts. 1 Unit.

An introduction to the elements and principles of design essential to the visual arts. These will include value, line, shape, form, balance, rhythm, texture, perspective, and color. A variety of media will be explored.

ARTS 101A. Drawing I. 1 Unit.

This course introduces the student to the practice and history of drawing. Using a range of different media and various technical and conceptual approaches, the course provides a solid foundation in the use of line, value, shape, composition, perspective, and content.

ARTS 102A. Sculpture I. 1 Unit.

The course will introduce the student to the tools and concepts used in the creation of three-dimensional art work. The course will cover additive (modeling), subtractive (carving), and assemblage processes.

ARTS 103A. Painting I. 1 Unit.

A basic course that acquaints the student with various approaches to painting through a study of its formal, technical, historical, and conceptual aspects. The course will cover color theory, value, composition, shape, naturalism, and abstraction.

ARTS 190. Special Topics in Art. 1 Unit.

These lecture/discussion courses are designed to extend the range of the curriculum and give students an opportunity to explore special topics. Their topics are contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Any prerequisites will be indicated in the course schedule. Students may take more than one ARTS 190, ARTS 290, ARTS 390, or ARTS 490 course during their career with different titles and content.

ARTS 200A. Art About. 1 Unit.

Students will immerse themselves in a topic (such as "Art About Collective Memory," "Art About Gender," "Art About Sports") chosen by the instructor. Students will be exposed to theory about this topic and to artists whose practices explore this topic. They will develop original artwork in various media (dependent on course, but frequently with an intermedia approach) with a shared conceptual through line. Course may be repeated with different content.

ARTS 201A. Drawing II. 1 Unit.

This course continues the student?s exposure to the practice, theory, and history of drawing at a level beyond Drawing I. Prerequisite: ARTS 105A or permission of instructor. Offered in the spring semester.

ARTS 202. Sculpture II. 1 Unit.

A continuation of Sculpture I, in which the student will be expected to take on work at a more challenging level. Prerequisite: ARTS 102A.

ARTS 203. Painting II. 1 Unit.

Continuation of Painting I, in which the student will be expected to take on work at a more challenging level. Prerequisite: ARTS 206. Offered once per year.

ARTS 212A. Ceramics: Handbuilding. 1 Unit.

This technique of working with clay is a more sculptural approach using hand-building techniques such as coil, slab, and pinch methods. Offered in the fall semester.

ARTS 213. Mixed Media. 1 Unit.

A basic course that introduces the student to various nontraditional static media. The class will include 2-dimensional, 3-dimensional, and site-specific installation projects. There will be considerable emphasis on a contemporary conceptual approach to art-making. Prerequisite: Any ARTS 100-level course or permission of instructor.

ARTS 214B. All Things are Delicately Interconnected - Global Food and Art in Venice. 1 Unit.

The title of this course pulls from contemporary artist Jenny Holzer?s text-based work, which highlights the delicate balances at play in interconnected, global systems. This interdisciplinary course uses Venice as a case study for understanding global systems in two distinct disciplines ? sustainable food systems and contemporary art. Though these disciplines seem starkly different, they are in fact delicately connected and both provide opportunities for engaging with and understanding globalization, oppression, and a rapidly changing climate. Permission of instructor required.

ARTS 222A. Ceramics: Wheel-Throwing. 1 Unit.

Students will learn to use the potter?s wheel to make both functional and non-functional pieces. Frequent demonstrations by the instructor. Offered in the spring semester.

ARTS 232. Ceramics II. 1 Unit.

An advanced ceramics class; a continuation of work involving hand-building techniques to explore both functional forms and forms which are sculptural. Students will be introduced to various methods of kiln firing (gas and electric), oxidation, and reduction. Prerequisite: ARTS 212A or ARTS 222A or permission of instructor. Offered once per year.

ARTS 285. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

ARTS 290. Special Topics in Art. 1 Unit.

These lecture/discussion courses are designed to extend the range of the curriculum and give students an opportunity to explore special topics. Their topics are contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Any prerequisites will be indicated in the course schedule. Students may take more than one ARTS 190, ARTS 290, ARTS 390, or ARTS 490 course during their career with different titles and content.

ARTS 302. Special Studio. 1 Unit.

This course, offered only on an occasional basis, will emphasize some special medium, technique, or approach which is not part of the regular departmental offerings. Examples would be mixed media, airbrush painting, etc. The course may be repeated with different content.

ARTS 303. Painting III. 1 Unit.

This course builds on concepts and techniques learned in Painting II. With the input of the professor, each student will be expected to develop and carry out a series of projects that reflect their interests as a painter. Prerequisite: ARTS 203. Offered once a year.

ARTS 321. Printmaking. 1 Unit.

This is an introductory course that acquaints the student with the basic types, techniques, and history of printmaking. Prerequisite: ARTS 105A or permission of instructor.

ARTS 332. Ceramics III. 1 Unit.

This course builds on concepts and techniques learned in Ceramics II. Students will develop advanced skills in glaze formulation, clay body testing, and kiln firing techniques. Prerequisite: ARTS 232. Offered once a year.

ARTS 335. Art in the Elementary School. 1 Unit.

An elementary art methods course, geared to the classroom teacher and special art teacher. It should provide the student with imaginative art teaching strategies, in-depth art making, and art appreciation. This course is offered only as an independent study as a service to students completing requirements for certification.

ARTS 345. Art in the Secondary School. 1 Unit.

This course teaches students to use their background in art and design, their technical skills in selective media, and their knowledge of art history in developing projects and plans for teaching art at the secondary level. This course is offered only as an independent study as a service to students completing requirements for certification.

ARTS 385. Independenty Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

Study on a specialized project under the guidance of a professor.

ARTS 390. Special Topics in Art. 1 Unit.

These lecture/discussion courses are designed to extend the range of the curriculum and give students an opportunity to explore special topics. Their topics are contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Any prerequisites will be indicated in the course schedule. Students may take more than one ARTS 190, ARTS 290, ARTS 390, or ARTS 490 course during their career with different titles and content.

ARTS 395. Teaching Apprenticeship. 0.5 Units.

Pass/Fail only. Students assist a faculty member with the teaching and management responsibilities related to one of the program?s existing courses. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. May be repeated once.

ARTS 398. Open Studio. 1 Unit.

An advanced course for students who have completed all offered courses in painting, drawing, or printmaking. In addition to continued practice in one or more of the above disciplines, attention will be paid to contemporary art issues and to questions of professional activity. This course may be repeated 3 times. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

ARTS 402. Advanced Special Studio. 1 Unit.

This course, taught only on an irregular basis, will pursue some special technique at an advanced level.

ARTS 403. Painting IV. 1 Unit.

This course builds on concepts and techniques learned in Painting III. In this course, the student will be expected to produce an ambitious, unified body of work that demonstrates a high level of achievement in painting. Prerequisite: ARTS 303. Offered once a year. Course may be repeated 3 times.

ARTS 432. Ceramics IV. 1 Unit.

This course builds on concepts and techniques learned in Ceramics III. With the input of the professor, each student will be expected to develop and carry out a series of projects that reflect their interests as a ceramicist. Students will also oversee the glaze and bisque firings for the ceramics studio. Prerequisite: ARTS 332. Offered once a year. Course may be repeated 3 times.

ARTS 485. Independent Study. 0.5 or 1 Units.

Study on a specialized project under the guidance of a professor.

ARTS 490. Special Topics in Art. 1 Unit.

These lecture/discussion courses are designed to extend the range of the curriculum and give students an opportunity to explore special topics. Their topics are contingent upon the expertise of current departmental faculty. Any prerequisites will be indicated in the course schedule. Students may take more than one ARTS 190, ARTS 290, ARTS 390, or ARTS 490 course during their career with different titles and content.

ARTS 498. Senior Project I. 1 Unit.

This course serves as a collaborative research group project. Together, students will demonstrate mastery of the critical inquiry process inherent to theatre arts by researching a topic or question related to one of Stetson?s Core Values (Personal Growth, Intellectual Development, Global Citizenship). This course will culminate in a live theatre production that results from the research generated through this creative inquiry.Offered very year in the fall semester. Offered every year in the fall semester.

ARTS 499. Senior Project II. 1 Unit.

This course is required of all senior art majors. In the spring semester, students prepare and install their Senior Exhibitions. In this course, the student completes the development of a unified body of accomplished work. Prerequisites: ARTS 498. Offered every year in the spring semester.